Artillery in Canadian service: 90-mm M1A1 Anti-aircraft Gun

90-mm M1A1 Anti-aircraft Gun

(Author Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, South Gate, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick Military History Museum.

(Author Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, South Gate, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick Military History Museum.

(Author Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, inside the Main Gate.  5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick Military History Museum.

(Maxwell Toms Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, 72382 stamped on the barrel, Chevrolet, and General Motors stamped on the breech.  The left indicator regulator (M1A1) on the gun bears a plate with the serial number 19873.  This gun is on display near the parking lot.   This type of gun was used by the American army during the Second World War, but it was not adopted by the Canadian army until the early 1950s when it replaced the British 3.7 inch anti-aircraft gun.  The breech of this gun has been welded shut and the wheels used when the gun is being transported have been removed.  Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site of Canada, Colwood, British Columbia.

(Author Photo, 30 Jan 2019)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site of Canada, Colwood, British Columbia.

(Author Photo, 30 Jan 2019)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site of Canada, Colwood, British Columbia.

(wildwoodke Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft (Serial No. 2879).  This gun was obtained in 1967 from the West Coast  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 123, cenotaph on 50th Street, Sangundo, Alberta.

(wildwoodke Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft (Serial No. 2879).  50th Street, Sangundo, Alberta.

(Author Photos)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, Serial No. 10154, West of the Base Accommodations Building, CFB Borden, Ontario.

(Author Photos)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, Serial No. 4192, North of the Base Theatre, CFB Borden, Ontario.

(Normand Roberge Photo)

90-mm M1A2 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 5623), Ord Dept USA WVT Arsenal.  Across from the Royal Canadian Legion, Cobalt, Ontario.

(Terry Honour Photo)

90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 1 of 2 on display in front of the Armoury at 1 Garrison Way, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

(Terry Honour Photos)

90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 2 of 2on display in front of the Armoury at 1 Garrison Way, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

(RCA Museum Photo)

The M242  fire-control component of the M33 Anti-Aircraft Fire Control System used by Canada and other NATO countries in the 1950’s.  It had a radar range of 25,600 metres (28,000 yards).  It was operated by a 10-man detachment, with three fire control trailers, a generator trailer, four towing vehicles and one light truck.  The principal components of the AA FCS M33 are the acquisition antenna assembly, tracking antenna, radar cabinet, computer, tactical-control console, and the tracking console.  It served in direct support to the 90-mm AA Gun.

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