Canadian Expeditionary Force (1A) Training and Reserve Battalions, Nos. 6-160

Canadian Expeditionary Force Training and Reserve Battalions, Nos. 6-160

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.324.

6th (Western Canada) Battalion, Fort Garry Horse. Authorized 10 August 1914, disbanded 5 April 1918. It became a Training and Reserve battalion..

The 6th Battalion was a composite battalion raised by the 34th Fort Garry Horse as an infantry battalion at Camp Valcartier Quebec in August 1914 under authority of Privy Council Order 2067 of August 5th 1914. The 6th Battalion comprised of volunteers from cavalry regiments from Western Canada these volunteering to serve as infantry under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.W. Paterson (34th Fort Garry Horse) assigned to the 2nd Infantry Brigade. The 6th Battalion was formed from personnel of the 18th Mounted Rifles (160), 20th Border horse (123), 22nd Saskatchewan Light horse (175), 23rd Alberta Rangers (with additional personnel from the 21st Alberta Hussars and 15th Light horse) (78), 32nd Manitoba horse (44)and the 34th Fort Garry horse (234). The Battalion sailed with the First Contingent October 3rd 1914 with 40 officers and 1115 other ranks.

Initially the establishment of the 1st Division was set at four infantry brigades each of four infantry battalions. However after arrival in England to conform to the British establishment this was altered to three brigades each of four battalions. Three of the now surplus battalions became reinforcing battalions, the 9th. 11th and 12th; (the 17th already having been declared a reinforcing Battalion). On January 22nd the 6th (Infantry) Battalion (Fort Gary Horse) was reorganized as a Cavalry Depot being relocated to Jellalabad Barracks from Lark Hill Camp. Six Officers and 210 other Ranks joining the 10th Battalion, this now replacing the 6th Battalion in the 2nd Brigade.  It formed the nucleus of the Remount Depot on 20 January 1915, and the remainder of the battalion's personnel were absorbed by the Canadian Cavalry Depot, CEF, on 6 March 1915 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field. (Chris Brooker)

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3405992)

9th Canadian Battalion at Plymouth after church parade, October 1914.

9th Battalion. Authorized 10 August 1914, disbanded 15 September 1917. The 9th Battalion became a Training and Reserve battalion.

The 9th Infantry Battalion was raised at Camp Valcartier Quebec almost exclusively from the 101st Edmonton Fusiliers (1,247 All ranks) with just a small additional contingent of 77 all ranks from Ottawa, the battalion being authorized under General Order 142 of 5 July 1915. The 101st Regiment (Edmonton Fusiliers) later contributed to the 65th, 138th, 194th, and 202nd Battalions. The 9th Battalion sailed with the 1st Contingent on 3 October 1914 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel S.M. Rogers (Reserve Officers List), with a strength of 44 officers and 1101 other ranks.

After the arrival of the 1st Contingent in England the proposed structure of the 1st Division was changed from four to three infantry Brigades, the 4th Infantry Brigade being deleted from the Order of Battle and the four surplus battalions being designated as reserve and training battalions. Of the 17 Infantry Battalions forming the 1st Contingent the 6th Battalion became a Cavalry Depot while the 9th, 11th, 12th and 17th Battalions became training and reserve battalions for the three Infantry Brigades of the 1st Canadian Division. The 9th Battalion was assigned the reserve and training battalion for the 1st Infantry Brigade, the 11th Battalion for the 2nd Infantry Brigade, the 12th Battalion for the 14th Infantry Battalion and later the PPCLI, and the 17th Battalion for the 13th, 15th and 16th Highland Battalions.

Effective 15 September 1915 the 9th Battalion was designated as the 1st Training Brigade serving in this capacity until 3 January 1917 when the 1st Training Brigade was disbanded. In January 1917 the 9th Battalion became the nucleus for the 9th Reserve Battalion. It was one of two reserve battalions formed in January 1917 to supply reinforcements to the CEF battalions from Alberta serving on the Western Front. In September 1917 the 9th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 21st Reserve Battalion, becoming the sole reinforcing battalion for the Alberta Regiment. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 9th Battalion was disbanded effective September 15th 1917 under General Order GO 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.348.

11th Battalion. Authorized 10 August 1914, disbanded 12 October 1917.

The 11th Infantry Battalion was a composite battalion formed in August 1914 at Camp Valcartier Quebec under authority of Privy Council Order 2067 of August 5th 1914 authorized under General Order 142 of 1914. The 11th Battalion comprised of volunteers from militia regiments from Military Area 10 which at this time encompassed both Manitoba and Saskatchewan. (Military District 13, Saskatchewan was established in 1917) The 11th Battalion was formed from contingents of the following Militia Regiments.52nd Regiment (Prince Albert Volunteers) (150), 60th Rifles of Canada (294), 95th Regiment(Saskatchewan Rifles) (171), 100th Regiment (Winnipeg Grenadiers) (471), 105th Regiment (Saskatoon Fusiliers) (255), plus a small detachment of 21 personnel from Humboldt, Saskatchewan. The 11th Battalion sailed with the First Contingent October 3rd 1914 with 45 officers and 1119 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. Burritt (100th Winnipeg Grenadiers).

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3406004)

Farriers of the 12th Battalion at work on Salisbury Plain, c1914.

12th Battalion. Authorized 10 August 1914, disbanded 30 August 1920.

The 12th Battalion was a composite battalion formed in August 1914 at Camp Valcartier Quebec under authority of Privy Council Order 2067 of August 5th 1914 authorized under General Order 142 of 1914.The 12th Battalion comprised of volunteers from militia regiments from both Quebec and the Maritime provinces. Cavalry volunteers were provided from the 29th New Brunswick Dragoons (17), and the 35th PEI Light horse (11), and the following infantry regiments: 4th Regiment (Chasseurs) (41), 8th Regiment(Royal Rifles) (368), 9th Regiment (Voltigeurs de Quebec) (29), 17th Regiment de Levis (7), 18th Regiment (Franc-Tireurs du Saguenay) (3), 53rd (Sherbrooke) Regiment (107), 54th Regiment (Carabiniers de Sherbrooke) (113), 61st Regiment de Montmagny (6), 62nd Regiment (St. John Fusiliers) (140), 64th (Chateauguay and Beauharnois) Regiment (23), 67th Regiment (Carleton Light Infantry) (30), 71st (York) Regiment (160), 73rd (Northumberland) Regiment. (76), 74th Regiment (The New Brunswick Rangers) (73),80th (Nicolet) Regiment (1), 82nd Regiment (Abgeweit Light Infantry) (31), 83rd (Joliette) Regiment (26),84th (St Hyacinth) Regiment (12), 85th Regiment (12), 89th (Temiscouta and Rimouski) Regiment (15),and the 92nd (Dorchester Regiment (9). The Battalion sailed with the First Contingent October 3rd 1914 with 45 officers and 1028 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.F. McLeod (71st York Regiment).

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395252)

Trench Mortar in firing position, May 1917.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3406049)

The 17th Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders), assembled in June 1915.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.551.

17th Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders). Authorized 19 September 1914, disbanded 21 May 1917. (Not with 3rd or 4th Infantry Brigades)

The 17th Infantry Battalion was a composite battalion formed in August 1914 at Camp Valcartier Quebec under authority of Privy Council Order 2067 of August 5th 1914. The battalion was raised from units of Military Area 6 (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island). This one of two, the second being the (first) 18th Battalion, formed from surplus troops over and above those assigned to the first 16infantry battalions, these each being around 1031 + 20% for base details etc. On September 27th prior to the 1st Contingent sailing for England the Provisional 18th Battalion was disbanded and its 10 officers and 356 other ranks were absorbed into other units. The 17th Battalion which included a sizable group of volunteers from the 94th Victoria Regiment (Argyll Highlanders) sailed with the First Contingent October 3rd 1914 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel S.G. Robertson (78th Pictou Highlanders), with a strength of 44 officers and 624 other ranks. Effective September 1st 1915 command of the 17th Infantry Battalion (Training and Reserve) was taken over by Lieutenant-Colonel D.D. Cameron, the Commanding Officer of the 78th Pictou Highlanders

After their arrival in England the battalion was designated as a Training and Reserve battalion to provide reinforcements for the 13th, 15th and 16th Highland Battalions serving with the 1st Canadian Division on the Western Front serving in this role until April 1916. With the formation of the 2nd Division an additional three infantry battalions were designated as Reserve and Training battalions these being the 23rd, 30th and 32nd Infantry Battalions. These three battalions were the first of the 2nd Division’s to reach England, this in February 1915, and were almost immediately sent to France to make up for the losses suffered by the 1st Division at the 2nd Battle of Ypres. As additional battalions over and above those assigned to the 2nd Canadian Division arrived from Canada they were designated as Training and Reserve Depots.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.327.

23rd Battalion. Authorized 21 Oct 1914, disbanded 15 September 1920.

The 23rd Infantry Battalion began recruiting in Montreal and Quebec City October 21st 1914 with headquarters at Montreal as a French speaking reinforcing and training battalion for the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade being authorized under General Order 35 of 1915. However the Francophone speakers were withdrawn from the battalion and reassigned to the 22nd Battalion to bring this up to strength prior to them sailing for England on 20 May 1915. The Francophone speakers being replaced with volunteers from Western Canada, 200 from Victoria BC, 200 from the 103rd Calgary Rifles in Alberta and a further 100 from Winnipeg. The 23rd, 30th and 32nd were assigned as reinforcing and training battalions for the 2nd Canadian Division sailed for England ahead of the main body of the 2nd Division proceeding to England in February 1915. The 23rd Battalion sailed on 23 February 1915 with 35 Officers and 942 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.W. Fisher (3rd Victoria Rifles).  On 29 April 1915, the unit was re-organized as the 23rd Reserve Battalion. By May of 1915 of the 2.884 all ranks of the 23rd, 30th and 32nd Battalions 2337 had been sent to France as reinforcements to replace the 1st Division’s losses in the Second Battle of Ypres. On 11 May 1917, the battalion was redesignated the 23rd Canadian Reserve Battalion (199th Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Canadian Rangers). The battalion was disbanded by general order on 15 September 1920.

30th Battalion (Vancouver). Authorized 27 Oct 1914, disbanded 1 September 1917.

The 30th Canadian Infantry Battalion began recruiting in British Columbia with mobilization headquarters at Victoria on 27 October 1914 being authorized under General Order 142 of 15 July 1915. The battalion was raised by the 68th Regiment (Earl Grey’s Own Rifles) this regiment later raising the 102nd Battalion. The 30th Battalion sailed for England on 23 February 1915 with a strength of 35 officers and 980 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.A. Hall (88th Victoria Fusiliers). The 23rd, 30th and 32nd Battalions had originally been assigned as the reinforcing and training battalions for the 2nd Division in a role similar to that played by the 9th, 11th, 12th and 17th in the 1st Division, however by May of 1915 within weeks of their arrival 2337 of the 2884 all ranks of the 23rd, 30th and 32nd Battalions had been sent to France as reinforcements to replace the 1st Division’s losses in the Second Battle of Ypres. After its ranks were replenished the 30th Infantry Battalion served as a reserve and training battalion for CEF battalions from British Columbia serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. During this period of its operations absorbed the 62nd and 88th Battalions on their arrival from Canada.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

30th Battalion, 2nd British Columbia Regiment.

(Nash Gordon Photo, Wikipedia)

39th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the parade grounds of the Belleville, Ontario, armoury building, preparing to sail overseas, c23 June 1915.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.356.

39th Battalion. Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 17 July 1920.

The 39th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Eastern Ontario by the 49thHastings Rifles with mobilization headquarters at Belleville December 25th 1914 under General Order 86of July 1st 1915. The 49th Hastings Rifles previously having contributed 51 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and is also associated with raising the 139th, 155th,245th and 254th Battalions. The 39th Battalion sailed for England June 24th 1915 with 40 officers and 1003 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.A.V. Preston (45th Durham Regiment). In England the 39th Battalion was assigned as the training and reinforcing battalion for the 2nd and 21st Battalions serving on the Western Front and during its period of operations absorbed the 37th ,59th 70th,93rd and 135th Canadian Infantry Battalions. In January 1917 the 39th Battalion was reorganized, absorbing the remaining personnel of other Eastern Ontario battalions then in England to form the 5th Reserve Battalion, this along with the 7th Reserve Battalion were assigned as reinforcing battalions for the CEF units raised in Military District No.3 (Eastern Ontario). The battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.628.

40th Battalion (Nova Scotia). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 17 July 1920.

The 40th Canadian Infantry Battalion was raised in March 1915 by the 63rd Halifax Rifles with mobilization headquarters at Aldershot, (Halifax) the battalion being authorized under General Order 86 of July 1st 1915. The 63rd Halifax Rifles had previously contributed 26 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Prior to sailing for England on 18 October 1915 the 40th Battalion provided two reinforcing drafts to the CEF the first of five officers and 250 OR's sailing for England on 15 June 1915, a second of five officers and 250 OR's on 9 October 1915. The 40th Battalion sailed for England October 18th 1915 with 40 officers and 1090 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. Vincent (85th Regiment). Prior to sailing the 40th Battalion had absorbed a draft of volunteers of Maritime descendants living in Winnipeg who had previously joined the 90th Winnipeg Rifles but transferred to the 64th Battalion and from this to the 40th Battalion. (The 64th Battalion raised over 2000 volunteers and was split into two battalions the 64th Nova Scotia and 104th New Brunswick Battalions.) At this time the maritime provinces were grouped into Military Area No.6, New Brunswick not becoming a separate Military District, No.7, until 1917. In January 1917 the 40th Battalion amalgamated with other Nova Scotia Battalions then in England to form the 25th Reserve Battalion one of two Reserve battalions supplying reinforcements to Nova Scotia Battalions serving in France and Flanders In May 1917 the 25th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 17th Reserve Battalion. This becoming the sole reinforcing battalion for the Nova Scotia Regiment, this authorized under General Order 77 of 15 April 1918 supplying reinforcements to the 25th and 85th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Both the 17th and 25th Reserve Battalions as components of the Nova Scotia Regiment were disbanded under General Order 213 of 15 November 1920. The 40th Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.357.

41st Battalion (French Canadian). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 15 September 1920.

The 41st Canadian Infantry Battalion was a Francophone battalion authorized to be recruited at Ottawa and Quebec with mobilization headquarters at Quebec City on 11 March 1915 the battalion being authorized under General Order 86 of July 1st 1915. The 41st Battalion was raised by the 85th Regiment this having previously provided 143 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment also provided volunteers to the 57th, 69th and 163rd Battalions and later raised the 205th Battalion. The 41st Battalion sailed for England on 1 June 1915 with 42 officers and 963 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L.H. Archambeault (65th Carabiniers Mont-Royal). A reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s followed the battalion on June 17th 1915 all being assigned as reinforcements for the 22nd Battalion. (Incidentally the 41st Canadian Infantry Battalion had the worst reputation for barroom fighting and brawling in the CEF.) In January 1917 the 41st Battalion was amalgamated with other CEF Francophone battalions to form the 10th Reserve Battalion.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.566.

45th Battalion (Manitoba). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 17 July 1917.

The 45th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Manitoba with mobilization headquarters at Brandon on 1 February 1915 under General Order 86 of July 1st 1915. The 45th Battalion was raised by the 99th Manitoba Rangers this regiment previously having contributed 186 volunteers to the 8th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 79th and 181st Battalions. Prior to the 45th Battalion sailing for England on 13 March 1916 it provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 other ranks to the CEF this sailing September 4th 1915. The 45th Battalion embarked for England with of 36 officers and 1,115 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.J. Clark (C.O. 7th Mounted Brigade, M.D. No.10) where it was assigned to the Training and Reserve Brigades until amalgamating with other Manitoba battalions in England to form the 11th Reserve Battalion January 3rd 1917. The 45th Battalion was disbanded effective 1 June 1918 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997;28.385.

48th Battalion (British Columbia). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 30 August 1920.

The 48th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in British Columbia with mobilization headquarters at Victoria on 22 February 1915 under General Order 86 of July 1st 1915. The battalion was raised by the 50th Gordon Highlanders and the 88th Victoria Fusiliers these regiments having previously having provided 262volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation and 247 volunteers to the 7th Battalions respectively at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Together both battalions later helped to raise the 67th, 88th, 103rd and 143rd Battalions. The 48th Battalion sailed for England on 1 July 1915 with 38 officers and 1020 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.J.H. Holmes (102nd Rocky Mountain Rangers). Sailing on the date of the battalion’s authorization.

3rd Pioneer Battalion (48th Canadians).

After its arrival in England the 48th Infantry Battalion was redesignated as the 3rd Pioneer Battalion (48th Canadians) this being authorized under General Order 69 of July 1916, being assigned as the Pioneer Battalion of the 3rd Canadian Division. The 3rd Pioneers (48th Canadians) served in this capacity from mid 1916 until 31 May 1917 when the unit was broken up for reinforcements at which time the 123rd Pioneer Battalion became the 3rd Divisional Pioneer Battalion. The 48th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 196 of July 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.564. 1997.28.381.

51st Battalion (Edmonton). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 15 September 1920.

The 51st Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Edmonton on 4 January 1915 under General Order 86 of 1 July 1915. The battalion was raised by the 101st Edmonton Fusiliers this regiment previously having provided 1247 volunteers to the 9th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914; later raising the 63rd, 138th and 202nd Battalions. The 51st Battalion sailed for England on 18 April 1916 with 37 officers and 1055 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. De. L. Harwood (101st Edmonton Fusiliers), where the battalion became the nucleus of the 5th Training Brigade under command of Colonel S.M. Rogers previously the C.O. of the 9th CEF Battalion. In January 1917 the Training Brigades were disbanded on the formation of the Reserve Battalions. During its period of operations as a training and reinforcing battalion the 51st Canadian Infantry Battalion absorbed personnel from 71st, 74th, 80th and 84th Canadian Infantry battalions. From January 1917 until demobilization the 51st Battalion served as Garrison Troops in England being disbanded under General Order 151 of 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.354.

53rd Battalion (Northern Saskatchewan). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 12 October 1917.

The 53rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Military Area No.10. (Saskatchewan not becoming a separate Military District until 1917), with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg on 15 March 1915 being authorized under General Order 86 of 1 July 1915. The 53rd Battalion was raised by 52nd Prince Albert Volunteers and the 105th Regiment (Saskatoon Fusiliers) these regiments previously having provided 150 and 255 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. These regiments later helping raise the 65th, 95th, 188th and 232nd Battalions. Prior to embarking for England on 1 April 1916 the 53rd Battalion provided two reinforcing drafts to the CEF the first of five officers and 250 OR’s this sailing on 17 June 1915, the second of five officers and 250 OR’s on 4 September 1915. The 53rd Battalion sailed for England with 35 officers and 1063 OR's. (On 1 April 1916 Lieutenant-Colonel R.M. Dennistoun (Rank) was designated commanding officer serving until August 1st 1916.) In January 1917 the 53rd Battalion amalgamated with other prairie battalions forming the 15th Reserve Battalion. The 53rd Battalion was disbanded effective 1 December 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.562.

55th Battalion (New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 21 May 1917.

The 55th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island with mobilization headquarters at Sussex New Brunswick on 2 May 1915 under General Order 86 of 1 July 1915. At this time both part of Military Area No. 6 encompassing Nova Scotia, P.E.I. and New Brunswick. It was not until 1917 that New Brunswick was designated as Military District No. 7. The 55th Battalion was one of three to be raised by the 74th New Brunswick Rangers the regiment had previously contributed 73 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later formed the 145th and 235th Battalions. The 55th Battalion sailed for England with 42 officers and 1097other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.R. Kirkpatrick where in May 1916 it was absorbed into the 17th Battalion, Training and Reserve. The 17th Canadian Infantry Battalion served as the training unit.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.561. 1997.28.376.

56th Battalion (Calgary). Authorized 7 November 1914, disbanded 15 September 1917.

The 56th (Calgary) Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Calgary on 24 April 1915 under General Order 86 of 1 July 1915. The battalion being raised by the 103rd Calgary Rifles which had previously contributed 846 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August1914. The regiment also raised the 50th, 82nd, 89th and 137th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 23 March 1916 the 56th Battalion provided two reinforcing drafts to the CEF the first of five officers and 250 OR’s embarking July 5th 1915, a second of five officers and 250 OR’s September 11th 1915. The 56thBattalion sailed for England with 40 officers and 1070 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.C.G. Armstrong (103rd Calgary Rifles) being assigned to the 5th Training Brigade supplying reinforcements to the 50th Battalion serving on the Western Front. In January 1917 the 56th Battalion amalgamated with other Alberta battalions to form the 9th Reserve Battalion. The 56th Canadian Infantry was disbanded effective 15 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997/28.560.

57th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized 20 April 1917, disbanded 11 April 1918.

The 57th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Quebec City on April 1915 being authorized under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the9th Voltigeurs de Quebec. This regiment having previously contributed 29 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Prior to sailing for England June 2nd 1916 the 57thBattalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s under command of Lieutenant Colonel E.T. Paquette (17th Levis Regiment), this sailing on 21 July 1915. The 57th Battalion sailed for England on 2 June 1916 with 18 officers and 410 OR’s. (A reinforcing draft of 13 officers and 169 OR's under command of Major H. Renaude (A.M.C., 85th Regiment) also sailing on 2 June 1916 but it is currently undetermined if this draft was included in the above numbers.) The 57th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.577. 1997.28.368.

59th Battalion. Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 21 May 1917.

The 59th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec with mobilization headquarters at Barriefield Camp near Kingston on 1 July  1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 14th The Princess of Wales’ Own Rifles this regiment previously having contributed 76 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 21st Battalion and volunteers for the 135th, 155th, 253rd and 254th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 5 April 1916 the 59th Battalion provided two reinforcing drafts to the CEF the first of five officers and 248 OR’s this embarking on 27 July 1915, a second of five officers and 244 OR’s ranks on 13 November 1915. The 59th Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1073 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.J. Dawson. In August 1916 the 59th Battalion was absorbed by the 39th Infantry Battalion. The 39th Battalion had sailed for England June 24th 1915 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.A.V. Preston (14th The Princess of Wales’ Own Rifles ), with a strength of 40 officers and 1003 OR's where it served as a training and reinforcing battalion supplying reinforcements to the 2nd and 21st Battalions. During the period of its operations the 39th Battalion absorbed the 37th, 59th 70th, 93rd and 135th Canadian Infantry Battalions. In January 1917 the 39th Battalion was re-designated as the 5th Reserve Battalion. The 59th Battalion was disbanded effective 15 June 1917 under General Order 63 of 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.363.

60th Battalion (Victoria Rifles of Canada). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 20 April 1918.

The 60th Canadian Infantry Battalion was raised by the 3rd Victoria Rifles of Canada at Montreal being authorized to be mobilized at Montreal on 23 May 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915 .This regiment previously having provided 351 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later raised the 24th and 244th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 5 November 1915 the 60th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250other ranks this embarking July 27th 1915. The 60th Battalion sailed for England with 40 officers and 1024 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.A. Gascoigne (3rd Victoria Rifles of Canada). On its arrival the battalion was assigned to the 9th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division and served in this capacity until 30 April 1917, after the Battle of Vimy Ridge, when it was replaced in the line by the 116th Canadian Infantry Battalion. The 60th Battalion was broken up with one third of the soldiers going to the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles and two thirds to the 87th Battalion (15 officers and 508 other ranks). Being fully depleted of all ranks the 60th Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1918 under General Order 101 of 15 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.575. 1997.28.361.

61st Battalion (Winnipeg). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 17 July 1917.

The 61st Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Winnipeg on 15 May 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 90th Winnipeg Rifles and 106th Winnipeg Light Infantry. Prior to sailing for England on 5 April 1916 the 61st Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s this sailing on 11 September 1915. The 61st Battalion embarked for England with 37 officers and 1091 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.J. Murray (106th Winnipeg Light Infantry). The 61st Battalion was assigned to the 8th Training Brigade until amalgamating with other Manitoba Battalions to form the 11th Reserve Battalion in January 1917. The 61st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.367.

62nd Battalion (British Columbia). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 8 December 1917.

Vancouver, Victoria and Prince Rupert with mobilization Headquarters at Vancouver July 1st 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The battalion was raised by the 6th Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles this regiment this having previously provided 353 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 158th Battalion. Prior to sailing for England on 1 April 1916 the 62nd Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 249 OR’s this embarking October 1st 1915. The 62nd Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1037 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.H.D. Hulme (6th Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles) in July 1916 the battalion was absorbed into the 30th Battalion, Training and Reserve. The 30th Infantry Battalion served as a reserve and training battalion for British Columbia Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 62nd Battalion was disbanded effective 18 December 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.350.

63rd Battalion (Edmonton). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 1 September 1917.

The 63rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited at Edmonton, Medicine Hat and Calgary with mobilization headquarters at Edmonton on 28 June 1915 under General Order 103a of August15th 1915. The 63rd Battalion was raised by the 101st Edmonton Fusiliers this regiment having previously provided 1247 volunteers to the 9th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later raised 51st, 138th, and 202nd Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 24 April 1916 the 63rd Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s this embarking for England on 11 September 1915. The 63rd Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1018 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.B. McLeod (101st Edmonton Fusiliers) in January 1917 the 63rd Battalion amalgamated with other Alberta battalions in England as the 9th Reserve Battalion. The 63rd Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1969.2831.1a.

64th Battalion. Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 27 July 1917.

The 64th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be raised by the 66th Princess Louise Fusiliers being recruited in the three Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, at that time Military Area No.6, with mobilization headquarters at Sussex N.B. on 29 May 1915 being authorized under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The 66th Princess Louise Fusiliers previously having provided 32 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. By the fall of 1915 the 64th Battalion had enlisted over 2000 volunteers and the New Brunswick volunteers were allowed to transfer to the newly formed 104th New Brunswick Battalion. The 64th Battalion sailed for England pn 1 April 1916 with 38 officers and 1089 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.M. Campbell, (Imperial Army in command of 15th Infantry Brigade, 5th Division Sussex N.B.) where the battalion was absorbed into the 40th Battalion, Training and Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 64th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.373.

65th Battalion (Saskatchewan). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 12 October 1917.

The 65th (Saskatchewan) Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited at Winnipeg, Saskatoon and Prince Albert with mobilization Headquarters at Saskatoon on 9 September 1915 being authorized under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The battalion was raised by the 52nd Prince Albert Volunteers the 105th Regiment (Saskatoon Fusiliers) and 29th Light Horse, the two infantry regiments previously having provided 150 and 255 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 52nd, 95th, 188th and 232nd Battalions. Prior to sailing for England June 20th 1916 the 65th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft for the CEF, this sailing for England with five officers and 250 OR’s on September 25th 1915. The 65th Battalion embarked for England with 33 officers and 1040 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel N. Lang (29th Light Horse). After its arrival the 65th Battalion was initially assigned to the 51st Battalion this serving as a garrison battalion but was later used to bring the 44th, 45th, 54th and 72nd Battalions up to battle strength on the formation of the 4th Division in the fall of 1916. Being fully depleted of all troops the 65th Battalion was disbanded October 12th 1917 under General Order 82 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.387.

66th Battalion (Edmonton Guards). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 30 August 1920.

The 66th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Edmonton on 21 June 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 101st Edmonton Fusiliers this regiment previously having contributed 1247 volunteers to the 9th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 63rd, 138th and 202nd Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 1 May 1916 the 66th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s this embarking on September 11th 1915. The 66th Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1071 ORs under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.W.H. McKinery (Formerly a Major in the P.P.C.L.I.). In January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with other Alberta battalions in England to form the 9th Reserve Battalion. The 66th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395485)

Field Kitchen, 67th Pioneer Battalion, October 1916.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.382.

67th Battalion (Western Scots). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 30 August 1920.

The 67th Battalion (Western Scots), British Columbia, was recruited by the 50th Gordon Highlanders at Victoria on 23 June 1915 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lorne Ross being authorized under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The regiment previously having provided 262 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment also provided volunteers to the 103rd and 143rd Battalions. Although the regiment was a highland battalion only the Pipe band wore Highland dress (Douglas tartan) the battalion wearing regular infantry uniform. The 67th Infantry Battalion sailed for England on 5 April 1916 with a strength of 34 officers and 1045 OR’s and to France on 14 August 1916. In September 1916 the battalion was designated the 67th Pioneer Battalion (Western Scots) assigned as the pioneer battalion of the 4th Division. The battalion served in the 4th Division until after the Battle of Vimy Ridge when on 30 April 1917 it was withdrawn from the line and replaced by the 124th Pioneer Battalion, the surviving personnel being distributed as reinforcements. The 67th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.573.

68th Battalion (Regina). Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 21 May 1917.

The 68th (City of Regina) Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited at Regina and the Moose Jaw area of Saskatchewan on 5 July 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The 68th Battalion was raised by the 60th Rifles of Canada and the 95th Saskatchewan Rifles these having previously contributed 294 and 171 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. These two regiments also helped raise the 45th, 128th, 152nd and 195th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 1 May 1916 the 68th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s to the CEF, this embarking for England September 25th 1915. The 68th Battalion sailed for England with 34 officers and 1067 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel T.E. Perrett (95th Saskatchewan Rifles) where it was absorbed into the 32nd Battalion, Training and Reserve. In January 1917 the 32nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was converted to the 15th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 68th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 July 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.362.

69th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized 10 July 1915, disbanded 30 August 1920.

The 69th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Quebec July 3rd 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Montreal under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 65th Regiment Carabiniers Mont-Royal this regiment previously having provided 337volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later helped raise the 150th Battalion. The 69th Battalion sailed for England on 17 April 1916 with 34 officers and1023 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.A. Dansereau (Corps of Guides). In England the 69th Battalion provided reinforcements to the 22nd Battalion until January 1917 when it was absorbed into the 10th Reserve Battalion on its formation in England on 2 January 1917,  serving as the reinforcing battalion for the 22nd Battalion CEF the only French speaking battalion of the 48 serving with the Canadian Corps in France. The 69th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.378.

70th Battalion. Authorized 20 April 1915, disbanded 15 August 1918.

The 70th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in the Counties of Essex, Lambton, Kent and Middlesex on 1 September 1915 with mobilization headquarters at London under General Order103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 25th Middlesex Light Infantry this regiment previously having provided 26 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 135th Battalion. The 70th Battalion sailed for England 25 April 1916 with 35 officers and 936 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.I. Towers (27th Lambton Regiment) where it was absorbed by the 35th Battalion, Training and Reserve. In January 1917 the 35th Battalion was reorganized as the 4th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 70th Battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.377. 1997.28.571.

71st Battalion. Authorized 1 April 1916, disbanded 11 April 1918.

The 71st Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Oxford County and area with mobilization headquarters at Woodstock, Ontario August 30th 1915 under General Order 103a of August15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 22nd Oxford Rifles this regiment previously having contributed 69 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later raising the 168th Battalion. Prior to its sailing for England on 15 April 1916 the 71st Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 248 OR’s this embarking for England November 20th 1915. The 71st Battalion sailed for England with 35 officers and 963 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.M. Sutherland (24th Grey’s Horse) this being followed on 1 May 1916 by an additional draft of one officer and 46 OR’s. The 71st Canadian Infantry Battalion was absorbed into the 51st Garrison Battalion but provided drafts to the 44th and 54th Battalions. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 71st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1918.

73rd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada).  Authorized 10 July 1915, disbanded 19 April 1917.

The 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion CEF was authorized to be recruited in Montreal and Almonte, Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Montreal September 4th 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The 73rd Battalion was the third to be raised by the 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada (The Black Watch). All three battalions, the 13th, the 42nd and the 73rd serving as fighting units in France and Flanders. The 73rd Battalion sailed for England on 1 April 1916 with 36 officers and 1033 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P. Davidson (5th Royal Highlanders), being assigned to the 12thInfantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division. In June 1916 the 73rd Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of250 all ranks for the 42nd Battalion after their losses incurred in the June 1916 Battle of Mount Sorrel.(Another being provided by the 92nd Battalion) In January 1917 the CEF was reorganized and a territorial system was instituted to provide a steady stream of reinforcements for the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. This system consisted of regional garrison regiments in Canada, these with one or more Depot Battalions, which in turn supplied troops to Reserve Battalions in England which then provided reinforcements to the units serving in the field. (By mid 1916 it was no longer possible to raise volunteer battalions and henceforth the reinforcing pool was replenished with conscripts.) After the battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1917 a realignment of the battalions within the 9th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division and in the 12th Brigade, 4th Canadian Division took place. Two Montreal battalion the 73rd and 60th being disbanded and replaced with the 85th Battalion from Nova Scotia and 115th Battalion from Ontario respectively. (The 78th Battalion which had served as the fourth battalion in the 12th Brigade taking over as the third battalion in the brigade structure replacing the 73rd Battalion, the 85th filling the now vacant fourth slot. This change will be noted in the cloth formation patches.) The surviving personnel of the 73rd were distributed between the 13th, 42nd and 85th Battalions as reinforcements.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.375.

74th Battalion. Authorized 10 July 1915, disbanded on 19 April 1917.

The 74th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Peel and York Counties with mobilization Headquarters at Camp Niagara September 5th 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th1915. The battalion was raised by the 20th Halton Rifles and the 35th Peel Regiment these regiments previously having contributed 174 and 230 volunteers respectively to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The later raised the 37th, 75th, 125th, 164th and 234th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 1 April 1916 the 74th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250other ranks to the CEF this sailing October 1st 1915. The 74th Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1046 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.J. McCausland (35th Peel Regiment). In England the battalion was split into three drafts and distributed between the 50th, 51st Battalion, (these presumably being the Category ‘B’ personnel), and 52nd Battalions. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 74th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.383.

76th Battalion. Authorized 10 July 1915, disbanded 17 July 1917.

The 76th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Barrie, Orillia and Collingwood with mobilization headquarters at Niagara Camp on 28 July 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The battalion was raised by the 20th Halton Rifles and the 35th Peel Regiment these previously having contributed 171 and 230 volunteers respectively to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 37th, 74th, 125th, 164th and 234th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 25 April 1916 the 76th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of 5 officers and 250 other ranks this sailing for October 1st 1915. The 76th Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1006 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Ballantine (20th Halton Rifles). After its arrival the 76th Battalion was absorbed into the 35th Canadian Infantry Battalion training and reserve. In January1917 the 35th Battalion was reorganized and amalgamated to form the 3rd Reserve Battalion this serving as the reinforcing battalion for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 75thBattalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.380.

77th Battalion (Ottawa). Authorized 10 July 1915, disbanded 22 September 1916.

The 77th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in the Ottawa area with mobilization headquarters at Ottawa July 15th 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the Governor General’s Foot Guards, the 14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles, 15th Argyll Light Infantry, the 15th Prince Edward Regiment, 42nd Lanark and Renfrew and the 49th Hastings Rifles. Prior to sailing for England on June 20th 1916 the 77th Battalion provided a reinforcing daft to the CEF of five officers and 251 other ranks October 23rd 1915. The 77th Battalion embarked for England 1916 with 38 officers and 1007 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.R. Street (C.O. of the 8th Infantry Brigade 3rd Division, Ottawa). After its arrival the 77th Battalion was broken up providing reinforcements to the 45th (Suicide) Battalion and the 73rd (Black Watch) Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps in France. The Category ‘B’ personnel being assigned to the 51st (Garrison) Battalion. Currently no General Order disbanding the 77th Canadian Infantry Battalion has been located.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.370.

79th Battalion (Manitoba). Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 12 October 1917.

The 79th (Manitoba) Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Western Manitoba with mobilization headquarters at Brandon July 8th 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 99th Manitoba Rangers this regiment previously having contributed 186 volunteers to the 8th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 45th and 181st Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 25 April 1916 the 79th Battalion provided five reinforcing drafts to the CEF. The first of two officers and 100 OR’s on August 10th 1915, a second of three officers and 150 OR’s on 27 August 1915, a third of five officers and 250 OR’s on 25 September 1915, a fourth of five officers and 250 OR’s October 9th 1915 and a fifth draft of six officers and 249 OR’s on18 December 1915. The 79th Battalion sailed on 25 April 1916 with 37 officers and 1095 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G. Clinglan (12th Manitoba Dragoons). The 79th Battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 17th Battalion training and reserve on its arrival from Canada and used to reinforce the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles and 15th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 79th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.353.

80th Battalion. Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 80th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Eastern Ontario with mobilization Headquarters at Barriefield (near Belleville) September 1st 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 16th Prince Edward Regiment and 49th Hastings Rifles, with additional volunteers from the 14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles, 15th Argyll Light Infantry, and the 42nd Lanark and Renfrew. The 80th Battalion sailed for England on 22 May 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.G. Ketcheson (49th Hastings Rifles) with a strength of 35 officers and 1041 OR’s. In September 1916 the Battalion was absorbed into the 51st Canadian Garrison Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 80th Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.379.

81st Battalion. Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 81st Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Toronto September 1st 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The battalion was raised by the 12th York Rangers this previously having contributed 74 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and the 19th Lincoln Regiment. The 81st Battalion sailed for England on 1 May 1916 with 36 officers and 1067 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel B.H. Belson (19th Lincoln Regiment), where it was absorbed by the 35th Canadian Infantry Battalion this serving as a training and reinforcing battalion. During the period of operations the 35th absorbed the 81st and 111th Infantry Battalions. In January 1917 the 35th Battalion was reorganized and amalgamated as the 4th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 81st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.175.

82nd Battalion. Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 82nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Calgary September 1st 1915 under General Order 103a of August 15th 1915. The battalion was raised by the 103rd Calgary Rifles this regiment having previously contributed 846 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 50th, 55th, 89th and 137th Battalions. The 82nd Battalion sailed for England on 22 May 1916 with 34 officers and 1006 OR’s ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. Lowry (Corps of Guides). In January 1917 the 82nd Battalion amalgamated with other Alberta battalions to form the 9th Reserve Battalion. The 82nd was disbanded effective 1 June 1917 under General Order 63 of 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.170

83rd Battalion (Queen's Own Rifles of Canada).  Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 83rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Toronto August 4th 1915 under General Order 103a of 15 August 1915. The battalion was recruited by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada. This regiment having previously contributed 975 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 95th, 165th, 198th and 255th Battalions. Prior to sailing for England on 1 May 1916 the 83rd Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s this sailing for England September 25th 1915. The 83rd Battalion embarked for England with 35 officers and 1081 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. Pellet (2nd Q.O.R.). The 83rd Battalion was almost immediately broken up to provide reinforcements to the 3rd, 4th and 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles in the field Being fully depleted of all ranks the 83rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 July 1917 under General Order 63 of 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.171.

84th Battalion. Authorized on 10 July 1915, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 84th Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto July 29th 1915 authorized under General Order103a of 15 August 1915 by the 109th Regiment. This was one of a number of Militia Regiments raised after the start of the First World World War to recruit volunteers for the CEF others being the 55th Irish Canadian Rangers and the 58th (Westmount) Rifles at Montreal, the 70th Hull Regiment, the 108th Regiment at Berlin, later renamed Kitchener, and the 110th Irish Regiment this also at Toronto. The 109th Regiment was authorized under General Order effective 15 December 1914 and disbanded in the post First World War reorganization of the Canadian Militia. Prior to sailing for England on20 June 1916 the 84th Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 other ranks to the CEF this sailing for England September 25th 1915. The 84th Battalion embarked for England with 36 officers and 913 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.T. Stewart (C.O. 109th Regiment). After its arrival the battalion was broken up with drafts going to the 73rd (Royal Highlanders) and the 75th Battalion these being assigned to the 4th Division the remainder of the troops likely the category ‘B’ personnel merging with the 51st (Garrison) Battalion in England. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 84th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective June 1918 under General Order 82 of 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.172.

86th Battalion (Machine Gun). Authorized on 22 Dec 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

Organized in August 1915 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Stewart. Authorization published in General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. Mobilized at Hamilton. Recruited in Hamilton, Welland and Dundas. Embarked from Halifax 22 May 1916 aboard ADRIATIC. Disembarked in England on 29 May 1916. Strength: 36 officers, 1072 other ranks. Reorganized as Canadian Machine Gun Depot on 22 June 1916. Drafts: 60 to Machine Gun Company, 64 to 10th and 28th Battalions, 78 sent to 5th, 10th, 14th and 29th Battalions in October 1916. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635568)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.174.

88th Battalion (Victoria Fusiliers). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 88th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Victoria on 1 November 1915 under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The 88th Battalion was raised by the 88th Victoria Fusiliers one of the few CEF battalions to retain the number of its parent Militia Regiment this regiment had previously provided 247 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and along with its sister regiment from Victoria, the 50th Gordon Highlanders, later raised the 48th, 67th, 103rd and 143rd Battalions. The 88th Battalion sailed for England on 2 June 1916 with 34 officers and 1029 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.J.R. Cullen (88th Victoria Fusiliers),where it was almost immediately absorbed into the 30th Infantry Battalion, Training and Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 88th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.161.

89th Battalion (Alberta).  Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 89th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited in Alberta on 9 October 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Calgary under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 103rd Calgary Rifles this regiment having previously contributed 846 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 50th, 55th, 82nd and 137th Battalions. The 89th Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1916 with 33 officers and 969 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.W. Nasmyth (45th Durham Regiment Retd., Honorary Rank) being almost immediately absorbed into the 9th Battalion, Training and Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 89th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 1 June 1917 under General Order 63 of 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.321.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.572.

90th Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles).  Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 90th Canadian Infantry Battalion was authorized to be recruited and mobilized at Winnipeg under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The 90th Battalion was one of four raised by the 90th Winnipeg Rifles and one of the few CEF battalions to retain the number of its parent Militia Regiment. The 90th Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1916 with 36 officers and 1087 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. Munro (90th Winnipeg Rifles),almost immediately being used as reinforcements for the 8th Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 90th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1918. Motto: HOSTI ACIE NOMINATI - “Named by the enemy force.”

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

91st Battalion (Elgin).  Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 91st Battalion was raised in Elgin County October 23rd 1915 with mobilization headquarters at St. Thomas effective December 22nd 1915. The Battalion sailed for England June 29th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.J. Green (RCR).On the formation of the 3rd Division in England in late 1915 the number of reserve and Training battalions was increased to 18. At this time some of the original seven Reserve and Training Battalions were realigned to conform to the infantry battalions raised in the different Military Districts in Canada. In July 1916 the 12th Infantry Battalion Training and Reserve and 91stInfantry Battalion were absorbed by the 23rd Battalion Training and Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 91st was disbanded on 1 June 1917 under General Order 62 of 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.163.

92nd Battalion (48th Highlanders). Authorized on 30 July 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 92nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited and mobilized by the 48th Highlanders of Canada at Toronto August 2nd 1915 under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The regiment previously having provided 836 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 134th Battalion. Prior to the 92nd Battalion sailing for England on 22 May 1916 the Battalion provided a reinforcing draft of five officers and 250 OR’s this embarking November 27th 1915.The 92nd Battalion sailed for England with 36 officers and 1096 ORs under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.T. Chisholm (48th Highlanders). In January 1917 the 92nd Battalion amalgamated with other Ontario battalions in England to form the 5th Reserve Battalion. The 92nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.164.

93rd Battalion (Peterborough). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 93rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Peterborough under General Order151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 57th Regiment (Peterborough Rangers) this regiment previously having contributed 67 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 93rd Battalion embarked for England June 29th 1916 with 36 officers and868 OR’s ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel T.J. Johnston (3rd Prince of Wales Canadian Dragoons). Shortly after its arrival the 93rd Battalion was absorbed by the 39th Canadian Infantry Battalion, training and reserve and used to reinforce battalions serving on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 93rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.165.

94th Battalion (New Ontario). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 94th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Northern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Port Arthur (Now Thunder Bay) 1 November 1915 under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 98th Kenora Light Infantry this regiment previously having contributed 80 volunteers to the 8th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier on its formation in August 1914. The 94th Battalion embarked for England on June 1916 with 36 officers and 1009 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.A.C. Machin (Honorary rank). On its arrival in England the battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 32nd Battalion, Training and Reserve. The 94th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 27th 1918 under General Order 101 of 15 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.166.

95th Battalion. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 95th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto October 26th 1915 under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada. This regiment had previously contributed 975 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and also raised the 83rd, 165th, 198th and 255th Battalions. The 95th Battalion embarked for England 2 June 1916 with 36 officers and 1061 OR’s ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.K. Barker(2nd Q.O.R.). In January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with the 96th (Canadian Highlanders) and the 92nd Battalion (48th Highlanders) to form the 5th Canadian Reserve Battalion. The 95th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.168.

96th Battalion (Canadian Highlanders). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 96th (Canadian Highlanders) Battalion was recruited in Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Saskatoon under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The 96th Battalion was raised in part by 52nd Prince Albert Volunteers and the 105th Regiment (Saskatoon Fusiliers) these two regiments had previously provided 150 and 255 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Also later helping raise the 53rd, 65th, 188th and 232nd Battalions. The 96th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Glenn (15th Light Horse) with a strength of 29 officers and 768 other ranks. In January 1917 the 96th Canadian Highlanders merged with the 92nd Battalion (48th Highlanders) to form the 5th Canadian Reserve Battalion. The 96th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.167

97th Battalion (American Legion). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 5 April 1918.

The 97th (American Legion) Battalion was recruited and mobilized in Toronto under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. One of a five CEF battalions recruited in different provinces from expatriate US citizens living in Canada at the time of the First World War. (Not all volunteers were Americans or domiciled in the USA). Although no documentation has been located it would appear that the commanding officers of the five battalions corresponded with regard to the formation of an all American infantry brigade to be called the ‘American Legion’ with each battalion wearing similar patterns of badges. The files regarding the design and authorization of badges for most of the units raised in Military District No.2 are documented in the Canadian Archives but unfortunately very few of any other Military Districts. Authorization for the first‘ American Legion’ pattern badges was issued on 15 January 1916 but this was withdrawn effective 25 April 1916. The second ‘Acta non Verba’ pattern being authorized on 27 May 1916. A sketch of the proposed design for the badges of the 213th Battalion (St Catharines) with ‘American Legion’ motto was submitted for approval to the A.A.G. & Q.M.G. on 29 April 1916, presumably badges for the 211th, 212th and 237th being made at the same time to their respective Military District A.A.G. & Q.M.G’s. The design of the badges for the U.S. volunteer battalions incorporated the Coat-of-Arms of George Washington as the main device. Badges bearing the motto ‘AMERICAN LEGION’ were struck for most of the five U.S. Volunteer battalions before use of this wording was denied and the motto replaced with the approved ‘ACTA NON VERBA’. Most of the battalions forming the American Legion were only able to raise a minimal number of recruits and the majority of the personnel of the 212th and 237th were absorbed into the 97th Battalion prior to this sailing for England on 19 September 1916 with 31 officers and 798 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.L. Jolly (13th Royal Regiment). In December 1916 the 97th Battalion was absorbed by the RCR/PPCLI Depot. Being fully depleted of all ranks the battalion was disbanded under General Order 60 of 15 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.483.

98th Battalion (Lincoln and Welland). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 98th (Lincoln and Welland) Battalion was recruited on the Niagara peninsula on November 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Welland under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 44th Lincoln and Welland Regiment this regiment previously having contributed 202 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 175th Battalion. The 98th Battalion embarked for England July 15th 1916 with 36 officers and 1050 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.A. Rose (44th Lincoln and Welland Regiment). It is believed that in October 1916 the battalion was absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion. training and reserve and used to reinforce battalions serving on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 98th Battalion was disbanded effective July 9th 1917 under General Order 82 of July 1st 1918.


(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.150.

99th Battalion (Essex). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 99th (Essex County) Battalion was recruited in Southwestern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Windsor being authorized under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 21st Essex Fusiliers this previously having provided 229 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment also provided volunteers to the 18th Battalion and later raised the 241st Battalion. The 99th Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel T.B. Welch (Brigade Major 3rd Infantry Brigade M.D. 2, London) with a strength of 36 officers and 825 other ranks. Almost immediately after its arrival the 99th Battalion was absorbed into the 35th Canadian Infantry Battalion, training and reserve and used to reinforce Western Ontario battalions serving in the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 99th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 9 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.151.

100th Battalion (Winnipeg Grenadiers). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 100th Battalion was raised and mobilized at Winnipeg on 29 November 1915 under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 100th Regiment Winnipeg Grenadiers this regiment previously having provided 471 volunteers to the 11th battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment also provided volunteers to the 61st Battalion and raised the 78th Battalion. The 100th Battalion embarked for England on 19 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.B. Mitchell (100th Winnipeg Grenadiers), with a strength of 31 officers and 880 OR’s. In January1917 the battalion amalgamating with other Manitoba battalions to form the 11th Reserve Battalion. The 100th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.152.

101st Battalion (Winnipeg Light Infantry. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 12 October 1917.

The 101st Battalion was recruited by the 106th Regiment, Winnipeg Light Infantry and mobilized at Winnipeg on 29 November 1915 under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The regiment previously having provided 665 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914and later providing volunteers to the 61st Battalion, then later raising the 222nd and 226th Battalions. The 101st Battalion embarked for England 29 June 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D. McLean (106th Winnipeg Light Infantry) with a strength of 36 officers and 1025 OR’s where it was almost immediately was absorbed into the 17th Battalion, Training and Reserve and used to reinforce the 25th Battalion serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front and the 85th Battalion then still in England. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 101st Battalion was disbanded October 12th 1917 under General Order General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.153.

103rd Battalion. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 103rd ‘Timber Wolves’ Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Victoria under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the Victoria Independent Squadron, hence the horse-shoes featured on the badges with additional personnel from the 50th Gordon Highlanders and 88th Victoria Fusiliers. The 103rd Battalion embarked for England on 24 July 1916 with 37 officers and 939 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel E.C.J. Henniker (30th B.C. Horse), where in January 1917 amalgamated with the 121st Battalion to become the 16th Reserve Battalion. This was one of three reserve battalions providing reinforcements for British Columbia battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. In August 1917 the 16th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 1st Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 103rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.406.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.581.

104th Battalion. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 104th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited October 24th 1915 in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Sussex under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The 104th Battalion was raised primarily by the 67th Regiment Carleton Light Infantry the regiment had previously contributed30 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 40th Battalion. The 104th Battalion embarked for England on 29 July 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.W. Fowler (Cadet Committee and M.P.), with a strength of 42 officers and 1084 OR’s. In January 1917 in a rather complicated shuffle within a number of various New Brunswick Battalions and the105th PEI Battalion then in England, Lieutenant-Colonel Fowler took over Command of the newly formed13th Reserve Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel Ings of the 105th (PEI) Battalion took over command of the104th Battalion, this assigned as one of the battalions slated for the proposed 15th Infantry Brigade, 5thCanadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of its 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to units in the field, increasing the establishment of the infantry battalions to around 1100 men each. The remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 104th Battalion being absorbed into the 13th Reserve Battalion. The 104th Canadian Infantry Battalion being fully depleted of all ranks was disbanded effective 27 July 1918 under General Order 101 of 15 August 1918. The 13th Reserve Battalion as a component of the New Brunswick Regiment was disbanded under General Order 213 of 15 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection,Bella Doherty Photo

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.582.

105th Battalion (Prince Edward Island Highlanders). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 12 Oct 1917.

The 105th (Prince Edward Island) Battalion was recruited on PEI with mobilization headquarters at Charlottetown under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 82nd Abegweit Light Infantry and the 36th PEI Light Horse both regiments had previously contributed 31 and 11 volunteers respectively to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The battalion embarked for England on 16 July 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.E. Ings (36th P.E.I. Light Horse), with a strength of 37 officers and 1087 other ranks. In January 1917 in a rather complicated shuffle within a number of various New Brunswick Battalions and the 105th PEI Battalion then in England Lieutenant-Colonel G.W. Fowler took over Command of the newly formed 13th Reserve Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel Ings took over command of the 104th Battalion, this assigned as one of the battalions slated for the proposed 15th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. Some personnel of both the 104th and 105th were absorbed into the 13th Reserve Battalion while some of the 105th were reassigned to the 104th Battalion. The 105th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918. The 13th Reserve Battalion as a component of the New Brunswick Regiment was disbanded under General Order 213 of 15 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.583.

106th Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 8 December 1917.

The 106th Canadian Infantry Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles) was recruited in Nova Scotia with mobilization headquarters at Truro under General Order 151 of 22 December  1915 by the 76th Colchester and Hants Rifles and the 81st ‘Hants’ Regiment these regiments having previously contributed volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later formed the 25th Battalion this serving in the 5th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division. The 106th Battalion embarked for England July16th 1916 with 36 officers and 1009 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. Innes (81st Hants Regiment). After its arrival the battalion was absorbed by the 40th Battalion, Training and Reserve this serving as a Training and Reserve battalion for Nova Scotia Battalions serving on the Western Front. In January 1917 the 40th Battalion was reorganized and amalgamated with other Nova Scotia battalions to form the 26th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 106th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective December 8th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.155.

107th Battalion (Winnipeg). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 107th (Timber Wolves) Battalion was recruited by the 32nd Manitoba Horse at Winnipeg on 4 November 1915 being authorized under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The 32nd Manitoba Horse previously contributing 44 volunteers to the 6th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 107th Battalion embarked for England September 19th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G. Campbell (R.C.A.) with a strength of 32 officers and 965 OR’s. On 27 January 1917 the battalion was redesignated as the 107th Pioneer Battalion sailing for France in the spring of 1917 replacing the 1st Pioneers in the 1st Division on 17 March 1917.

The 107th Pioneer Battalion served until February 1918 when the pioneer battalions were absorbed into the Canadian Engineers on reorganization. The unit being split into three detachments these being added to the1st, 2nd and 3rd Canadian Engineering Battalions, 1st Canadian Engineer Brigade this later being designated as the 1st Brigade, Canadian Engineers. The 107th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920. The 1st Brigade, Canadian Engineers under General Order 192 of November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.156.

108th Battalion (Selkirk). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 4 August 1917.

The 108th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Manitoba November 4th 1914 with mobilization headquarters at Selkirk under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion embarked for England 19 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.H. Bradbury D.S.O. (Honorary Rank) with a strength of 32 officers and 843 OR’s. The 108th Battalion was absorbed into the 14th Reserve Battalion on its formation in January 1917. This one of three reinforcing battalions for Manitoba Battalion serving on the Western Front. The 14th Reserve Battalion was itself absorbed by the 11th Reserve Battalion in October 1917. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 108th Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Jim Wellington Photo)

(Private Collection Photo)

1997.28.157.

109th Battalion (Victoria & Haliburton). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 109th (Victoria and Haliburton) Battalion was recruited in the counties of Victoria and Haliburton with mobilization Headquarters at Lindsay under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 45th Victoria Regiment this regiment previously having contributed 68 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 252nd Battalion. The 109th Battalion embarked for England July 24th 1916 with 35 officers and 775 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.J.H. Fee (45th Victoria Regiment). In November 1916 the battalion was broken up being absorbed into the 20th, 21st and 38th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps in France and the 124th Battalion then in England. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 109th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.158.

110th Battalion (Perth). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 110th (Perth) Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Perth County with mobilization headquarters at Stratford under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 28th Perth Regiment this regiment previously having provided 146 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 110th Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.L. Youngs 28th Perth Regiment), (K.I,A. on 9 April 1917), with a strength of 26 officers and 635 other ranks. In January 1917 the battalion merged with other Ontario battalions to form the 8th Central Ontario Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion for the 2nd Central Ontario Regiment and provided reinforcements to the 58th and 116th Battalions, and after August 1917 also to the 54th and102nd Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranksthe 110th Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.159. 1997.28.584.

111th Battalion (South Waterloo). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 111th (South Waterloo) Battalion was recruited in Waterloo county with mobilization headquarters at Galt under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 29th Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada) this designation having been authorized on 15 April 1915, the 29th Waterloo Regiment having previously having provided 118 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 111th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September 1916 with 25 officers and 637other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.D. Clarke (29th Regiment), where the battalion being almost immediately absorbed into the 35th Battalion, Training and Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 111th Canadian Infantry Battalion troops was disbanded effective under General Order 63 of 15 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

112th Battalion (Nova Scotia). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 August 1918.

The 112th Battalion was recruited in Nova Scotia with mobilization Headquarters at Windsor under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 69th Annapolis and 75th Lunenburg Regiments these previously having provided 35 and 28 volunteers respectively to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 112th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 with 36officers and 1090 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.B. Tremaine (81st Hants Regiment). The Battalion merged with the 40th Battalion to form the 26th Reserve Battalion in January1917. The 112th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 27th 1918 under General Order 101 of 16 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.137.

113th Battalion (Lethbridge Highlanders). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 113th Battalion (Lethbridge Highlanders) Battalion was recruited in Lethbridge and district of Southern Alberta with mobilization headquarters at Lethbridge under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 21st Alberta Hussars and the 23rd Alberta Rangers these regiments previously having contributed 78 volunteers to the 6th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, and later provided volunteers to the 31st, 151st, 175th and 187th Battalions and 12th and 13th Canadian Mounted Rifles. The 113th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 with a strength of 30 officers and883 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. Pryce Jones (15th Light Horse). Upon arrival on England the 113th Battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 17th Battalion, Training and Reserve which in January 1917 was reorganized as the 17th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 113th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

114th Battalion (Haldimand). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 114th (Brock’s Rangers) Battalion was recruited from the Six Nation’s Indian Reservation in Haldimand County, Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Cayuga under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 37th Regiment (Haldimand Rifles) this regiment previously having contributed 76 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 114th Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 with 30 officers and 679 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.T. Thompson (5th Infantry Brigade) where it was almost immediately broken up and absorbed into the 35th and 36th reinforcing and training battalions. In the CEF Native Americans were greatly prized for their skills as both marksmen and scouts, many becoming snipers. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 114th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 June 1917 under General Order 63 of 15 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.265. 1997.28.585.

115th Battalion (New Brunswick). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 115th (New Brunswick) Battalion was recruited in New Brunswick by the 62nd St. John Fusiliers with mobilization headquarters at Saint John under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 the regiment previously having contributed 140 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and to the 26th Battalion serving with the 5th infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division. The 115th Battalion embarked for England on 24 July 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.V. Wedderburn (8th Hussars), with a strength of 34 officers and 801 other ranks. In January 1917 the 115th Battalion merged with the 112th Battalion forming the 26th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 115th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1st September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918,

**

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.139.

117th Battalion (Eastern Townships). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 117th (Eastern Townships) Battalion was an Anglophone battalion raised in Quebec December 1st 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Sherbrooke under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion being raised by the 53rd Sherbrooke Regiment this previously having contributed 107 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 117th Battalion embarked for England August 14th 1916 with 36 officers and 943 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Gilbert (3rd Mounted Brigade). In January 1917 the 117th Battalion was absorbed into the 23rd Battalion, Training and Reserve, this now being designated as the 23rd (Montreal) Reserve Battalion. One of three reinforcing battalions for the English speaking CEF Battalions from Quebec serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front at that time. The 23rd Reserve Battalion supplied reinforcements for the 14th, 24th, 87th and 5th CMR Battalions. The 117th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.140.

118th Battalion (North Waterloo). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 118th (North Waterloo Overseas) Battalion was recruited in Waterloo County under General Order 151of December 22nd 1915 by the 108th Regiment with mobilization headquarters at Berlin, Ontario, the name being changed to Kitchener in 1916 in the patriotic fervor and anti German sentiment of the First World War. The 108th Regiment was one of a number of Militia Regiments raised after the start of the First World War to raise CEF battalions. Others include the 55th Irish Canadian Rangers and the 58th (Westmount) Rifles at Montreal and the 109th and 110th Irish Regiment both from Toronto. The 118th Battalion embarked for England January 26th 1917under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.M.O. Lochead (108th Regiment), with a strength of just 15officers and 231 other ranks where it was almost immediately absorbed into the 25th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 118th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.141.

119th Battalion (Algoma). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 119th (Algoma Overseas) Battalion was recruited in the Algoma district and Manitoulin Island region of Northern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Sault Ste. Marie under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 51st Regiment (Soo Rifles) this regiment previously having contributed 126 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914,later raising the 227th Battalion. The 119th Battalion embarked for England August 9th 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 935 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel T.P.T. Rowland (51stSoo Rifles). The 119th Battalion was assigned as one of the battalions for to the proposed 15th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions, the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder was absorbed into the 8th Reserve Battalion (2nd Central Ontario Regiment) the reserve pool for the 54th, 58th, 102nd and 116th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 119th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective November 29th 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.142.

120th Battalion (City of Hamilton). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 120th (City of Hamilton) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Hamilton under General Order 151 22 of December 1915. The 120th Battalion was one of three battalions to be raised primarily by the 13th Regiment Hamilton Light Infantry the regiment previously having contributed 181 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and the 86th Machine Gun Battalion in 1915, the regiment later formed the 205th Battalion. The 120th Battalion embarked for England August 14th 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 838 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.D. Fearman (13th Royal Regiment). In January 1917 the 120th Battalion amalgamated with other Ontario battalions to form the 2nd Reserve Battalion one of two reserve battalion formed in January 1917 to reinforce battalions from Central Ontario serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 120th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June  1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.143.

121st Battalion (Western Irish). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 121st (Western Irish) Battalion was recruited in British Columbia with mobilization headquarters at New Westminster under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 11th Irish Fusiliers of Canada this regiment previously having contributed 355 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 121st Battalion embarked for England August 14th 1916 with 32 officers and 1033 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.W. McLelan (11th Irish Fusiliers) where in January 1917 the 121st and the 103rd Battalions amalgamated to form the 16th Reserve Battalion one of two reinforcing battalions for British Columbia battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 16th Reserve Battalion supplied reinforcements to the 54th and 102nd Battalions and the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles Regiment. In February 1918 the 16th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 1st Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion for the British Columbia Regiment providing reinforcements to the 7th, 29th and 72nd Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 121st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th1917 under General Order 82 of June 1st 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.144.

122nd Battalion (Muskoka). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 122nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in the Muskoka region of Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Huntsville in Northern Ontario under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 23rd Northern Pioneers this regiment previously having provided 152 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, the regiment later raised the 162nd Battalion. The 122nd Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D. McK. Grant (35th Simcoe Foresters), with a strength of 26 officers and 686 other ranks. After its arrival in England due to its high preponderance of skilled northern woodsmen the 122nd Battalion was absorbed into the Canadian Forestry Corps. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 122nd Battalion was disbanded effective September1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.145.

123rd Battalion (Royal Grenadiers). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 123rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto November 12th 1915 under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 10th Regiment Royal Grenadiers this regiment previously having contributed 401 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 58th and 204th Battalions. The 123rd Battalion embarked for England August 9th 1916 with just 12 officers and 369 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kingsmill (10th Royal Grenadiers). Effective on 1 February 1917 the battalion was converted from infantry to pioneers under the designation of the 123rd Pioneer Battalion. In March 1917 with the addition of reinforcements from the Canadian Pioneer Training Depot the 123rd Pioneers became the Divisional Pioneers of the 3rd Canadian Division, replacing the 3rd Pioneer Battalion (48th Canadians) which was disbanded and its remaining personnel being used as reinforcements for other pioneer battalions. The 123rd Pioneer battalion served with the 3rd Division until May 1918 when the unit was disbanded and its personnel distributed amongst the three Engineering Battalions of the 3rd Canadian Engineering Brigade, this attached to the 3rd Canadian Division. The 123rd Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1998/28.146.

124th Battalion (Governor General's Bodyguard). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 124th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto November 9th 1915 by the Governor General’s Body Guard and 9th Mississauga Horse being authorized under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The G.G.B.G. had previously contributed 42 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion and the 9th Mississauga Horse 161 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on their formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 124th Battalion embarked for England August 9th 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 1004 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.C.V. Chadwick (9th Mississauga Horse). Effective 1 February 1917 the battalion was converted from infantry to pioneer battalion under the designation the 124th Pioneer Battalion replacing the 67th (Western Scots) as the pioneer battalion of 4th Canadian Division on 1 May 1917. The 124th Pioneer battalion served until May 1918 when the unit was disbanded and its personnel distributed amongst the 7th, 8th and 9th Battalions of the 4h Canadian Engineering Brigade, this attached to the 4th Canadian Division. The 124th Overseas Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.148.

125th Battalion (1st Overseas Battalion of 38th Regiment Dufferin Rifles). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 125th Battalion was recruited in Brant County with headquarters at Brantford under General Order 151of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 38th Dufferin Rifles of Canada this regiment having previously contributed 194 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The battalion embarked for England August 9th 1916 with 32 officers and 974 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel M.E.B. Cutcliffe (38th Dufferin Rifles). In February 1917 the 125th Battalion was assigned to the 14th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded and each of the 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the infantry battalions serving in the field with the Canadian Corps, the remainder being absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 125th Battalion was absorbed into the 8th Reserve Battalion this the reserve battalion for the 2nd Central Ontario Regiment and reinforcing the 54th, 58th, 102nd, and 116th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 125th Overseas Battalion was disbanded under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.147.

126th Battalion (Peel). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 126th (Peel) Battalion was recruited in Peel County with mobilization headquarters at Toronto under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The 126th Battalion was recruited principally by the 20thHalton Rifles and the 36th Peel Regiment these two militia regiments having previously contributed 171 and 230 volunteers respectively to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914.These regiments also later helped to raise the 37th, 74th, 76th, 164th and 234th Battalions. The 126th Battalion embarked for England August 14th 1916 with of 32 officers and 822 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.J. Hamilton (36th Peel Regiment). After its arrival provided drafts to the 109th and116th Infantry Battalions the remainder being absorbed into the 8th Reserve Battalion on its formation in January 1917. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 126th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.169.

127th Battalion (12th York Rangers). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 23 October 1920.

The 127th Battalion was recruited November 12th 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Toronto under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 12th Regiment York Rangers this previously having contributed 273 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, and later raised or provided volunteers to the 1st Construction Battalion and the 20th, 81st, 83rd, and 220th Infantry Battalions. On the expansion of the Canadian Railway Troops in 1916 the 127th Battalion requested that it be allowed to remain in tact as a railway construction battalion. Due to a high preponderance of the battalion being former railway men the offer was accepted and in November the 127th Infantry Battalion was redesignated as the 127th Battalion (Canadian Railway Troops). The battalion had already previously sent a strong contingent to the 1st Construction Battalion on its conversion to the 1st Battalion Canadian Railway Construction Battalion. The 127th Battalion embarked for England on 24 August 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 972 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.F. Clarke (12th York Rangers). Effective 3 February 1917 the 127th Battalion (Canadian Railway Troops) was designated as the 2nd Canadian Railway Troops. The unit sailed for France from Folkstone on 11 March 1917 serving on the Western Front for the duration of the Great War. The Battalion never adopted a‘ regimental’ pattern badge but continued to wear their original 127th Battalion pattern CEF badges. The 2nd Battalion Canadian Railway Troops were disbanded under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.149.

128th Battalion (Moose Jaw). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 128th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Saskatchewan November 19th 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Moose Jaw under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 60th Rifles of Canada and the 95th Saskatchewan Rifles these regiments previously having contributed 294 and 171 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Both regiments later contributed to the 46th, 68th, 152nd and 195th Battalions. The 128th Battalion embarked for England on 15 August 1916 with 32 officers and 985 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F. Pawlett (16th Light Horse) where in February 1917 the battalion was assigned to the 13th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was declared moribund and disbanded. Each of the 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the infantry battalions serving with the Canadian Corps in the field, the remainder being absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 128th Battalion being absorbed into the 15th Reserve Battalion (Saskatchewan Regiment) which formed the reinforcement pool for the 5th, 28th, 46th and 1st CMR Battalions. The 128th Overseas Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.221.

129th Battalion (Wentworth). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 129th (Wentworth) Battalion was recruited in Wentworth County with mobilization headquarters at Dundas under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 77th Wentworth Regiment this regiment previously having provided 78 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 129th Battalion embarked for England on 24 August 1916 with 32 officers and 807 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.E.S. Knowles (77th Wentworth Regiment). After its arrival the battalion was broken up with skilled drafts joining the 123rd Pioneers and 124th Railway Troops. In January 1917 the remaining personnel were assigned to the 12th Reserve Battalion on its formation this one of two reinforcing battalions for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment (The second being the 3rd Reserve Battalion.), The 12th Reserve Battalion provided reinforcements for 3rd, 15th, 20th, and 75th (Toronto) Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 129th Overseas Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.222.

130th Battalion (Lanark and Renfrew). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 130th (Lanark and Renfrew) Battalion was raised November 15th 1915 with headquarters at Perth under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The regiment was raised by the 42nd Lanark and Renfrew Regiment this previously having provided 128 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and providing volunteers to various other battalions raised in Eastern Ontario, the regiment later raising the 240th Battalion. The 130th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.F. de Hertal (42nd Lanark and Renfrew) with a strength of 25 officers and 573 OR's. In January 1917 the battalion was absorbed into the 12th Reserve Battalion on its formation. This one of two reinforcing battalions for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment (The second being the 3rd Reserve Battalion). The 12th Reserve Battalion provided reinforcements for 3rd 15, 20th and 75th (Toronto) Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 130th Overseas Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.223.

131st Battalion (Westminster). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 131st Battalion (Westminster) Battalion nicknamed the ‘Hungry and thirsty first’ was recruited and mobilized at New Westminster under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 104th Westminster Fusiliers of Canada the regiment previously having provided 153 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and volunteers to the 47th Battalion in February 1915. The 131st Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.D. Taylor (104th Westminster Fusiliers) with a strength of 32 officers and 954 other ranks. In January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with a number of other BC Battalions in England to form the 1st Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all troops the 131st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

132nd Battalion (North Shore). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 132nd (North Shore) Battalion was recruited in Northern New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Chatham under General Order 151 of 22December 1915 by the 73rd Northumberland Regiment this previously having provided 76 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment also later raised the 165th Battalion. The 132nd Battalion embarked for England on 26 October 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.W. Mercurial (73rd Northumberland Regiment), with a strength of 32 officers and 809 other ranks. On 9 December 1916 the 132nd Battalion provided 150 reinforcements for the 87th Battalion. In January 1917 the 132nd Battalion amalgamated with other New Brunswick Battalions to form the 13th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 132nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.224.

133rd Battalion (Norfolk's Own). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 133rd (Norfolk’s Own) Battalion was recruited with headquarters at Simcoe under General Order 151of December 22nd 1915 by the 39th Norfolk Rifles this regiment previously having contributed 30 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 133rd Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 with 21 officers and 665 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.C. Pratt (Honourary rank), being absorbed by the 36th Battalion, Training and this Reserve, becoming the 3rd Reserve Battalion in January 1917. Being fully depleted of all troops the 133rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.225.

134th Battalion (48th Highlanders). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 134th (48th Highlanders) Battalion was recruited December 4th 1915 and mobilized at Toronto by the 48th Highlanders of Canada, being authorized under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The134th Battalion was raised entirely from the 48th Highlanders this regiment previously having provided 836 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 92nd Battalion. The 134th Battalion embarked for England August 9th 1916 with 32 officers and 1078 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.A. Miller (48th Highlanders), where it was assigned to the 13th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 134th Battalion was absorbed into the 12th Reserve Battalion this one of two reinforcing battalions for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment (The second being the 3rd Reserve Battalion.) The 12th Reserve Battalion provided reinforcements for 3rd 15th, 20th and 75th (Toronto) Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 134th Battalion was officially disbanded under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

135th Battalion (Middlesex). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 4 June 1917.

The 135th (Middlesex) Battalion was recruited in Middlesex County with mobilization headquarters at London Ontario under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 26th Regiment Middlesex Light Infantry this previously having contributed 26 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 135th Battalion embarked for England on 24 August 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel B. Robson (26th Middlesex Light Infantry), with a strength of 32 officers and 910 other ranks. The battalion was absorbed into the 8th Reserve Battalion on its formation in January 1917. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 135th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.210.

136th Battalion (Durham). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 22 May 1917.

The 136th Battalion was recruited in the Counties of Durham, Ontario and Pontiac, and Western Quebec with mobilization headquarters at Kingston under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 46th Durham Regiment this regiment previously having contributed 50 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, additional volunteers were also provided by the 14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles, 15th Argyll Light Infantry, the 16th Prince Edward Regiment and the 49th Hastings Rifles. The 136th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.W. Smart (46th Durham Regiment), with a strength of 18 officers and 492 other ranks where it was almost immediately absorbed into the 39th Canadian Infantry Battalion, Training and Reserve. In January 1917 the 39th Infantry Battalion was reorganized as the 6th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 136th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.211.

137th Battalion (Calgary). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 137th (Calgary) Battalion was recruited and mobilized in Calgary under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 103rd Calgary Rifles the regiment had previously contributed 846 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later contributed volunteers to the 50th, 56th, 82nd, and 89th Battalions. The 137th Battalion embarked for England August 24th 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 932 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.W. Moffit (103rd Calgary Rifles). In January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with other CEF battalions raised in Alberta to form the 21st Reserve Battalion. The 137th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.212.

138th Battalion (Edmonton, Alberta). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 138th (Edmonton) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Edmonton under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 101st Edmonton Fusiliers this regiment having previously contributed 1247volunteers to the 9th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The Regiment also contributed to the volunteers to the 66th and 202nd Battalions. The 138th Battalion embarked for England August 24th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. Belcher (C.O. 5th Mounted Brigade M.D. 13),with a strength of 32 officers and 870 other ranks where in January 1917 merged with other Alberta Battalions then in England to form the 21st Reserve Battalion. The 138th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.213.

139th Battalion (Northumberland). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 139th (Northumberland) Battalion was recruited in Northumberland County with mobilization headquarters at Cobourg under General Order 151 of 22 December  1915 the battalion being raised from the 40th Northumberland and 46th Durham Regiments, these regiments previously having contributed 81 and 50 volunteers respectively to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. These two militia regiments also raised or provided volunteers to the 39th, 136th, 155th, 235th and 254th Battalions. The 139th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 with 21 officers and 495 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.H. Floyd (9th Infantry Brigade), where after its arrival was almost immediately absorbed into the 36th Canadian Infantry Battalion, Training and Reserve. In January 1917 the 36th Battalion was reorganized and merged with other battalions to form the 3rd Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 139th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.254.

140th Battalion (Saint John Tigers). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 140th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Saint John under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 being raised by the 71st York Regiment this previously having contributed 160 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 140th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L.H. Beer (36th P.E.I. Light Horse) with a strength of 33 officers and 820 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other New Brunswick battalions to form the 13th Reserve Battalion. The 140th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 102 of 15 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.214.

141st Battalion (Rainy River District). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 141st (Border) Battalion was recruited in the Rainy River district of Northern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Fort Francis near the Ontario/US border under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 96th Lake Superior Regiment this previously having provided 316 volunteers to the 8th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later the 52nd (New Ontario) Battalion. The 141st Battalion embarked for England on 29 April 1917 with 17officers and 466 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.C. McKenzie (98th Kenora Light Infantry), where it was absorbed into the 18th Reserve Battalion this one of two the reserve battalions providing reinforcements for the 8th, 78th and 52nd Battalion serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all troops the 141st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded, effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.215.

142nd Battalion (London's Own). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 142nd Battalion (London’s Own) was recruited on 23 November 1915 and mobilized at London Ontario under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 7th Fusiliers this regiment previously having contributed 146 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 33rd Battalion The 142nd Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 with a strength of 26 officers and 574 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.M.R. Graham (Honorary rank), where the battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 23rd Battalion, Training and Reserve supplying reinforcements to the 14th and 24th Battalions serving on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 142nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(Private Collection Photo)

1997.28.216.

143rd Battalion (British Columbia Bantams). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 4 April 1918.

On the outbreak of the First World War strict regulations for height, age, weight, marital status and health were established amongst the hoard of volunteers trying to join the CEF. As the war progressed and casualties started to mount the flow of volunteers dried up and by 1916 a number of ‘bantam’ battalions were formed from men of smaller stature who had previously volunteered for service but turned down due to height requirements. The 143rd (British Columbia Bantams) Battalion was recruited in BC with mobilization headquarters at Victoria under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 being raised by the 50th Gordon Highlanders and the 88th Victoria Fusiliers these regiments having previously having provided 262 volunteers to the16th Battalion on its formation and 247 volunteers to the 7th Battalions respectively at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. Together both battalions also provided volunteers to the 67th, 88th, 102nd and 103rd Battalions. The 143rd Battalion embarked for England on 17 February 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.B. Powley (88th Victoria Fusiliers), with a strength of 32 officers and 882 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 24th Reserve Battalion (with drafts sent to the Canadian Railway Troops). Being fully depleted of all ranks the 143rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 60 of 15 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Author Photo)

1997.28.162.

144th Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 144th (Winnipeg Rifles) Battalion was the third of five battalion raised by the 90th Winnipeg Rifles with mobilization at Winnipeg under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The 144th Battalion embarked for England September 19th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.W. Morley (90th Winnipeg Rifles), with a strength of 29 officers and 962 other ranks. In January 1917 the battalion merged with other Manitoba Battalions in England to form the 16th Reserve Battalion. The 144th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

145th Battalion (New Brunswick). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 145th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Kent and Westmoreland Counties in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Moncton under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915.The 145th Battalion was recruited by the 74th Regiment (The New Brunswick Rangers) this regiment previously having contributed 73 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 55th and 236th Battalions. The 145th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.E. Forbes (73rd Northumberland Regiment), with a strength of 19 officers and 524 other ranks. In January 1917 the 145th Battalion amalgamated with other New Brunswick units in England to form the 13th Reserve Battalion. The 145th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.217.

146th Battalion. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 146th Battalion was recruited in Eastern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Kingston under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 47th Frontenac Regiment this regiment previously having contributed 49 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914.being reorganized as the 12th Reserve Battalion in January 1917. The 146th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.218.

147th Battalion (Grey). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 147th (Grey) Battalion was recruited in Grey County Ontario with mobilization Headquarters at Owen Sound under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 31st Grey Regiment this previously having contributed 83 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later raised the 248th Battalion. The 147th Battalion embarked for England November 14th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.F. McFarland (31st Grey Regiment), with a strength of 32 officers and 910 other ranks where in January 1917 amalgamated with other Ontario battalions in England to form the 8th Reserve Battalion. The 147th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1st 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635560)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.219.

148th Battalion. Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 4 August 1917.

The 148th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in the Montreal area November 26th 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Montreal under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion being raised primarily from students, faculty and ex students of McGill University. The 148th Battalion embarked for England September 27th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.A. Magee (Major McGill COTC), with a strength of 32 officers and 953 OR's where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Quebec battalions to form the 20th Reserve Battalion, this the reinforcing battalion for the 13th, 42nd and 73rd (Black Watch) battalions then all serving on the Western Front. The 148th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.251.

149th Battalion (Lambtons). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 149th (Lambton) Battalion was recruited in Lambton County on 26 November 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Watford under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 27th Lambton Regiment (The St. Clair Borderers) this previously having contributed 136 volunteers to the1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 149th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 with 18 officers and 439 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.W. MacVicar (33rd Huron Regiment), where it was absorbed into the 4th and 25th Reserve Battalions. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 149th Battalion was disbanded effective 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2894446)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.252.

150th Battalion (Carabiniers Mont Royal). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 150th (Carabiniers Mont-Royal) Battalion was recruited and mobilized under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 at Montreal by the 65th Regiment Carabiniers Mont-Royal this regiment having previously provided 337 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later raised the 69th Battalion. The 150th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. Barre (65th Carabiniers Mont-Royal), with a strength of 24 officers and 515 other ranks where in February 1917 was assigned as one of the battalions for to the14th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. In February 1918 the 5th Division was declared moribund and disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 150th Battalion was absorbed into the 10th Reserve Battalion, the reinforcing battalion for the 22nd Battalion serving on the Western Front being disbanded on 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(Doug Hall Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.253.

151st Battalion (Central Alberta). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 151st (Central Alberta) Battalion was recruited with headquarters at Camp Sarcee, at that time just outside the city limits of Calgary, under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 21st Alberta Hussars and the 23rd Alberta Rangers these regiments previously having jointly contributed 78 volunteers to the 6th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later provided volunteers to the113th, 175th and 187th Battalions. The 151st Battalion embarked for England October 14th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.W. Arnott ( 49th Regiment, Honorary rank), with a strength of 29 officers and 925 other ranks where almost immediately after its arrival was split into drafts one being absorbed by the 9th Battalion, Training and Reserve another to the 11th Battalion, Training and Reserve, the remained personnel being absorbed into the 21st Reserve Battalion on its formation in January 1917. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 151st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded September 15th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

152nd Battalion (Weyburn-Estavan). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 152nd (Weyburn) Battalion was recruited with headquarters at Weyburn under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 95th Saskatchewan Rifles and the 20th Border Horse this regiment having previously contributed 123 volunteers to the 6th Battalion CEF on its formation at Camp Valcartier. The 152nd Battalion sailed for England October 4th 1916 with 29 Officers and 743 other ranks under Lieutenant-Colonel S.B. Nelles (95th Saskatchewan Rifles), where the battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 32nd Battalion, Training and Reserve, this being reorganized as the 15th Reserve Battalion in January 1917. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 152nd Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 15 June 1917.

153rd Battalion (Wellington). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 153rd (Wellington) Battalion was recruited in Wellington County with mobilization headquarters at Guelph under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 30th Wellington Rifles this previously having provided 61 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 153rd Battalion embarked for England on 29 April 1917 with a strength of 17 officers and 511 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.T. Pritchard (30th Wellington Rifles), where the 153rd Battalion was absorbed into the 25th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 153rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635559)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.250.

154th Battalion (Stormont-Dundas-Glengarry). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 154th (Stormont and Glengarry Highlanders) Battalion was recruited in the three Eastern Ontario counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry with mobilization headquarters at Cornwall, Ontario under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The 154th Battalion was raised by the 59th Dundas and Glengarry Regiment this regiment previously having provided 67 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 the regiment also providing volunteers to most of the infantry battalions raised in Eastern Ontario. The 154th Battalion embarked for England October 26th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.G.F. McDonald (59th Stormont and Glengarry Regiment), with a strength of 29 officers and 872 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other battalions raised in Eastern Ontario to form the 6th Reserve Battalion. The 154th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of June 1st 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.232.

155th Battalion (Quinte). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 155th (Quinte) Battalion was recruited in Hastings and Prince Edward Counties of Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Barriefield (near Kingston) under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 15th Argyll Light Infantry, with additional volunteers from the 14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles, the 16th Prince Edward Regiment and the 49th Hastings Rifles. The battalion embarked for England on 18 October 1916 with 29 officers and 826 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel M.K. Adams (16th Prince Edward Regiment), where in January 1917 amalgamated with other battalions raised in Eastern Ontario to form the 6th Reserve Battalion. The 155th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.247.

156th Battalion (Leeds and Grenville). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 156th (Leeds and Grenville) Battalion was recruited in the Counties of Leeds and Grenville with mobilization headquarters at Brockville under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915 by the 41st Brockville Rifles this regiment previously having provided 83 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 156th Battalion embarked for England on 18 October 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel T.C.D. Bedell (56th Grenville Rifles), with a strength of 28officers and 778 other ranks. In February 1917 it was assigned to the 14th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. In February 1918 the 5th Division was declared moribund and disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions, the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 156th Battalion was absorbed into the 6th Reserve Battalion the reinforcing Battalion for the Eastern Ontario Regiment supplying reinforcements to the 2nd, 21st and 38th Infantry Battalions and the PPCLI serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front being disbanded under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.248.

157th Battalion (Simcoe Foresters). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion CEF was raised in Simcoe County November 30th 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Barrie under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 35th Simcoe Foresters this regiment previously having provided 124 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 the regiment also raised the 177th Battalion. The 157th Battalion embarked for England on 18 October 1916 with 32 officers and 966 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.H. MacLaren where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Ontario battalions to form the 8th Reserve. The 157th Battalion was disbanded September 1st September 1917under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.282.

158th Battalion (The Duke of Connaught's Own). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 158th (Duke of Connaught’s Own) Battalion CEF was recruited in Vancouver November 30th 195under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 6th Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles) the regiment having previously provided 353 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later recruiting the 62nd Battalion. The 158th Battalion embarked for England November 14th 1916 with 31 officers and 966 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C. Milne (6th Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles), where in January 1917 it amalgamated with a number of other CEF Battalions raised in BC and then in England to form the 1st Reserve Battalion. The 158th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 27th 1917 under General Order 82 of June1st 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.283.

159th Battalion (1st Algonquins). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 159th (1st Algonquin) Battalion was recruited with mobilization headquarters located at Haileybury in the areas of Nipissing and Sudbury in Northern Ontario 1 December 1915 being authorized under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 97th Algonquin Rifles this previously having provided 263 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 the regiment later raised the 228th and 256th Battalions. The 159th Battalion embarked for England on 1 November 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel E.F. Armstrong (97th Algonquin Rifles), with a strength of 32 officers and 972 OR's where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Ontario battalions to form the 8th Reserve Battalion. The 158th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 27th 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.284.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.284.

160th Battalion (Bruce). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 160th (Bruce) battalion was recruited in Bruce County December 2nd 1915 with mobilization headquarters at Walkerton under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 32nd Bruce Regiment this previously having provided 72 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The motto of the 160th Battalion was Amor Patria (Love of Fatherland) this found below the numeral on the collar badges.) The 160th Battalion embarked for England on 17 October 1916 with 31 officers and 978 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. Weir (2ndInfantry Brigade), where in February 1917 it was assigned to the 13th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 160th Battalion was absorbed into the 4th Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion for the Western Ontario Regiment, providing reinforcements to the 1st, 18th and 47th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 160th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

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