Canadian Expeditionary Force (1B) Training and Reserve Battalions, Nos. 161-258

Canadian Expeditionary Force Training and Reserve Battalions, Nos. 161-258

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.285.

161st Battalion (Huron). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 161st (Huron) Battalion was recruited in Huron County on 2 December 1915 but with mobilization headquarters at London, Ontario under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 33rd Huron Regiment this regiment previously having provided 68 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The battalion embarked for England on 1 November 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.B. Combe (33rd Huron Regiment), with a strength of 28 officers and 749 OR's where it February 1917 was assigned to the 14th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions,(the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 161st Battalion was absorbed into the 4th Reserve Battalion. The 161st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

162nd Battalion (Parry Sound). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 162nd (Parry Sound) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Parry Sound December 2nd 1915 under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 23rd Northern Pioneers this regiment previously having provided 152 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later volunteers to the 122nd Battalion. The 162nd Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Arthurs (Honorary rank), with a strength of 30 officers and 766 OR's. In January 1917 the battalion was broken up and the personnel assigned to the 3rd and 4th Pioneer battalions via the 4th and 3rd Reserve Battalions. The 162 Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

4th Pioneer Battalion

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.286.

163rd Battalion (French Canadian). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 163rd (Canadiens Français) Battalion was recruited in the Province of Quebec on 10 December 1915with mobilization headquarters at Montreal under General Order 151 of December 22nd 1915. The battalion was raised by the 54th Regiment Carabiniers de Sherbrooke this regiment previously having provided 113 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 163rd Battalion embarked for Bermuda on 24 May 1916 in relief of the 38th Battalion which had been serving on Garrison Duty since 1915. The 163rd Battalion returned to Canada prior to embarking for England on 27 November 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. Des Rosiers (65th Carabiniers Mont-Royal), with a strength of 38 officers and 822 OR's. In January 1917 the 163rd Battalion merged with the 41st, 57th, 69th Battalions to form the 10th Reserve Battalion this under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. Des Rosiers. This serving as the reinforcing battalion for the 22nd Battalion the only French speaking battalion of the 48 serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 163rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.287.

164th Battalion (Halton and Dufferin). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 164th (Halton and Dufferin Battalion) was recruited with headquarters at Orangeville December 10th 1915 under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 20th Halton Rifles and 36th Peel Regiment these previously having contributed 171 and 230 volunteers respectively to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. These also provided volunteers to the 37th, 74th, 76th, 126th and 234th Battalions. The 164th Battalion embarked for England on 11 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P. Domville (13th Royal Regiment), with a strength of 26 officers and 710 OR's. Between February 1917 and 13 May 1917 the 164th Battalion was attached to the 13th Brigade, 5th Canadian Division but in May 1918 was detached and absorbed into the 8th Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion of the 2nd Central Ontario Regiment providing reinforcements to the 54th, 58th, 102nd and 116th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front being disbanded on 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

165th Battalion (Acadiens). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 April 1918.

The 165th (French Acadian) Battalion was recruited in the maritime provinces from French speaking Acadians with mobilization headquarters at Moncton, New Brunswick under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 by the 73rd Northumberland Regiment this previously having provided 76 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later raising the 132nd Battalion. The 165th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L.C. Daigle (Honorary rank), with a strength of 24 officers and 526 other ranks. After its arrival the Battalion was absorbed into the Canadian Forestry Corps and being fully depleted of all ranks was disbanded under General Order 60 of 15 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.289.

166th Battalion (Queen's Own Rifles of Canada). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 166th (Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto from the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. This was the third battalion to be raised primarily by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada that had previously contributed 975 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later formed the 83rd and 95th Battalions. The Q.O.R. later went on to raise the 198th and 255th Battalions. The 166th Battalion was raised under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.C. Lovesome (2nd Q.O.R.), and embarked for England October 13th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.G. Mitchell with a strength of 32 officers and 859 other ranks where in January 1917 amalgamated with other Ontario Battalions to form the12th Reserve Battalion this formed under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.G. Mitchell. The 166th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded September 15th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.290.

167th Battalion (Canadiens Français). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 12 July 1918.

The 167th (Canadiens Chasseurs) Battalion was recruited in the Province of Quebec by the 4th Regiment les Chasseurs Canadiens with mobilization headquarters at Quebec City under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915 This militia regiment having previously provided 41 volunteers to the 12th battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 167th Battalion was raised under command of Lieutenant-Colonel O. Readman (4th Chasseurs), did not serve overseas in 1917 being redesignated as the Quebec Recruiting Depot. This being absorbed into the 1st Quebec Depot Regiment in April 1918. The 167th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 98 of 1 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.291.

168th Battalion (Oxfords). Authorized on 22 December 1915, disbanded on 4 April 1918.

The 168th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Oxford County and area with mobilization headquarters at Woodstock under General Order 151 of 22 December 1915. The battalion was raised by the 22nd Oxford Rifles this regiment previously having contributed 69 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 71st Battalion The 168th Battalion embarked for England 1 November 1916 with 26 officers and 688 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.K. McMullen (22nd Oxford Rifles). In January 1917 the battalion was split into two drafts, one being assigned to the 4th Reserve Battalion the other to the 6th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 168th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under Order 60 of 15 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.288.

169th Battalion (109th Regiment). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 169th Battalion was the second CEF battalion raised by the militia 109th Regiment at Toronto. Being mobilized under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The 109th Regiment previously having raised the 84th Battalion. The 109th Regiment was one of seven Militia Regiments raised after the start of the First World War to recruit volunteers for the CEF. The others being the 55th Irish Canadian Rangers and the 58th (Westmount) Rifles at Montreal, the 70th Hull Regiment, the 81st Hants Regiment, the 108th Regiment at Berlin, later rename Kitchener, and the 110th Irish Regiment this also at Toronto. The 169th Battalion embarked for England October 26th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.G. Wright (109th Regiment), with a strength of 32 officers and 887 other ranks. On 7 February 1917 it was amalgamated with other Ontario battalions to form the 5th Reserve Battalion this one of three reinforcing battalions for battalions raised in Central Ontario serving on the Western Front. The 169th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1917 under GO 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.292.

170th Battalion (Mississauga Horse). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 170th (Mississauga Horse) Battalion was mobilized at Toronto under General Order 69 of July 15th1916 by the 9th Mississauga Light Horse this regiment previously having contributed 161 volunteers to the2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 75th Battalion. The 9th Mississauga Horse also provided volunteers to the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles on its formation in December 1914. The 170th Battalion embarked for England October 26th 1916 with 31 officers and 888other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L. Reed (9th Mississauga Horse), where in January1917 amalgamated with other CEF Battalions in England to form the 5th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 170th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.293.

171st Battalion (Quebec Rifles). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 171st (Quebec Rifles) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Quebec City under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916 by the 8th Royal Rifles of Canada this regiment previously having provided 368 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 171st Battalion sailed for England on 4 November  1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir W. Price (Permanent Force) with a strength of 27 officers and 574 other ranks. After arrival a draft was sent to the 4th Pioneers the remainder of the battalion merging with the 148th Canadian Infantry Battalion from Montreal to form the 20th Reserve Battalion; this the reserve battalion for the three Canadian Black Watch battalions the 13th, 42ndand 73rd all then serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 171st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 27th 1917 under GO.89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.294.

172nd Battalion (Rocky Mountain Rangers).  Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 172nd (Rocky Mountain Rangers) Battalion was recruited in the southern interior of British Columbia with mobilization headquarters at Kamloops under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 102nd Rocky Mountain Rangers this regiment previously having provided 123 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 172nd Battalion sailed for England October 25th 1916with 32 officers and 972 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Vicars (102nd Rocky Mountain Rangers), where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other BC battalions then in England to form the 24th Reserve Battalion. The 172nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective July 17th1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.660.

173rd Battalion (Canadian Highlanders). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 173rd (Canadian Highlanders) Battalion was recruited January 6th 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Hamilton under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion was raised by the 91stArgyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada this previously having provided 154 volunteers to the 16thBattalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 19th Battalion. The 173rdBattalion sailed for England November 14th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.H. Bruce (91st Canadian Highlanders), with a strength of 32 officers and 930 OR's where in January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with other Ontario battalions to form the 2nd Reserve Battalion one of a number of reinforcing battalions supply replacements to Central Ontario Battalions serving on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 173rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September1st 1917 under General Order 82 of June 1st 1918.

174th Battalion (Cameron Highlanders of Canada). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 174th (Cameron Highlanders of Canada) Battalion was recruited 14 January 1916 in the Provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion was raised by the 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada this regiment having previously provided 263 volunteers to the 16th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and also raised the 43rd and 179th Battalions. The 174th Battalion sailed for England on 29 April 1917 with just 14 officers and 275 OR's under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.F. Osler (79th Cameron Highlanders) where the battalion was absorbed into the 14th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 174th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under GO.82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.295.

175th Battalion (Medicine Hat). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 175th (Medicine Hat) Battalion was recruited in the southern Alberta region by the 21st Alberta Hussars and the 23rd Alberta Rangers with mobilization headquarters at Medicine Hat under General Order69 of July 15th 1916 these regiments previously having contributed 78 volunteers to the 6th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, and later also providing volunteers to the 31st, 113th, 151st, 187th and 191st Battalions. The 175th Battalion sailed for England October 4th 1916 with 30 officers and847 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel N. Spencer (Honorary rank), where in January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with other CEF battalions raised in Alberta then in England to form the 21st Reserve Battalion. The 175th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded July 17th 1917 under GO.82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.281.

176th Battalion (Niagara Rangers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 176th (Niagara Rangers) Battalion was recruited in the Counties of Lincoln and Welland by the 44thLincoln and Welland Regiment the battalion with mobilization headquarters at St. Catharines authorized under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. Previously the 44th Regiment had contributed 202 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 98th Battalion. The 176th Battalion sailed for England on 29 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D. Sharpe (2nd Dragoons), with a strength of 18 officers and 446 other ranks. After its arrival the battalion was absorbed into the 12th Reserve Battalion located at Witley Camp one of two reserve battalions for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment. The 176th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.301.

177th Battalion (Simcoe Foresters). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 April 1918.

The 177th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion was recruited in Simcoe County with mobilization headquarters at Barrie under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916 by the 35th Simcoe Foresters this regiment previously having provided 124 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914.The regiment also raised the 157th Battalion the badges for both battalions, including interim patterns, being almost identical. The 177th Battalion sailed for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.B. McGhee (35th Simcoe Foresters), with a strength of 19 officers and 549 other ranks. After its arrival the battalion was absorbed into the 3rd Reserve Battalion one of two reserve battalions for the 1st Central Ontario Regiment supplying reinforcements for the 4th and 19th Battalions and the 2nd and 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 177th Canadian Infantry battalion was disbanded effective 15 April 1918 under General Order 60 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.188.

178th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 178th ‘Nicolet’ Battalion was recruited in Quebec and Eastern Ontario by the 80th Nicolet Regiment with mobilization headquarters at Victoriaville under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The Battalion sailed for England on 4 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L. de la Girouard with a strength of 20 officers and 415 other ranks. The 80th Nicolet had previously provided a single volunteer to the 12thBattalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. In England the 178th Battalion was absorbed into the 10th Reserve Battalion formed in January 1917 as the reinforcing battalion for the 22nd Battalion CEF, this the only French speaking battalion of the 48 serving with the Canadian Corps in France. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 178th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded 1917 under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.193.

179th Battalion (Cameron Highlanders of Canada). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 179th (Cameron Highlanders of Canada) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada this previously having provided 263 volunteers to the 16th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later also raised the 43rd and 174th Battalions, this battalion not sailing for England until in April 1917. The 179th Battalion sailed for England on 4 October 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.Y. Reid (79th Cameron Highlanders), with a strength of 32 officers and 890 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Manitoba battalions in England to form the 17th Reserve Battalion. The 179th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.194.

180th Battalion (Sportsmen). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

The 180th (Toronto Sportsmen) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 110th Irish Regiment, this one of a number of Militia Regiments raised after the start of the First World War. Others include the 55th Irish Canadian Rangers and 58th (Westmount) Rifles at Montreal, the70th Hull Regiment, the 108th at Berlin, Ontario which shortly after changed the name to Kitchener, andthe 109th Regiment at Toronto. The 180th Battalion embarked for England 15 November 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.H. Greer (Honorary rank), with a strength of 31 officers and 833 otherranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Toronto battalions to form the 3rd Reserve Battalion. The 180th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 63 of 1 June 1917.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404519)

Canadian rifle grenade practice, Shorncliffe, UK, Sep 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.195.

181st Battalion (Brandon). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

Based in Brandon, Manitoba, the unit began recruiting during the winter of 1915, 1916 and 1917 in that city and the surrounding district. The 181st CEF Battalion embarked on the H.M.T Grampian in Halifax on 16 April, 1917. After sailing to Liverpool in England on 29 April 1917, the battalion was absorbed into the 18th Reserve Battalion on 29 April 1917 and was stationed in Dibgate Camp, Shorncliffe, England.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.196.

182nd Battalion (Ontario County). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 182nd (Ontario County) Battalion was recruited in Ontario County with mobilization headquarters at Whitby under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 34th Ontario Regiment this regiment previously having contributed 133 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 116th Battalion. The 182nd Battalion sailed for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.A. Cockburn (34th Ontario Regiment), with a strength of nine officers and 280 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 2nd Reserve Battalion, and reinforcing the 116th Battalion serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 182nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.197.

183rd Battalion (Manitoba Beavers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 8 December 1917.

The 183rd (Manitoba Beavers) Battalion was recruited in Manitoba January 15th 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916 .The battalion was raised by Honorary Colonel W.T. Edgcomb, a friend of Sir Sam Hughes, and was not affiliated with any militia regiment but an Orangeman of the Loyal Orange Order. The Battalion unofficially known as the Orange Battalion sailed for England October 16th 1916 with a strength of 13 officers and 431 OR's where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Manitoba Battalions then in England to form the 11th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 183rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective December 8th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.198.

184th Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 184th Battalion was recruited in the area around Lisgar in Southern Manitoba on 17 January 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The battalion was not affiliated with a militia regiment but raised by Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel W.H. Sharpe a prominent merchant and conservative member of the House of Commons representing Lisgar between 1908 and 1915.The Battalion sailed for England November 1st 1916 with a strength of 32 officers and 1042 OR’s where after its arrival in England the battalion was almost immediately absorbed into the 11th Battalion, Training and Reserve and used to reinforce Manitoba battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 184th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1969.2836.1.

185th Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 185th (Cape Breton Highlanders) Battalion, Nova Scotia Highland Brigade was recruited in Cape Breton with mobilization headquarters at Broughton under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 .The 185thBattalion was partially raised by the 94th Victoria Regiment (Argyll Highlanders) the regiment had previously contributed volunteers to the 17th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later helped raise the 85th Battalion. The 185th Battalion embarked for England under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.P. Day (28th New Brunswick Dragoons) 13 October 1916, with a strength of 36officers and 976 other ranks where it was assigned to the 15th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. In February 1918 the 5th Division was disbanded each of the 11 remaining battalions, (the 199th having previously been absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion), were ordered to send a drafts of 100 men each to the units in the field and the remainder were absorbed into the Reserve Battalions. The 185th Battalion was absorbed by the 17th Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion for the Nova Scotia Regiment supplying reinforcements to the 25th and 85th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 185th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.199.

186th Battalion (186th Kent). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 186th (Kent) Battalion was recruited in Kent County in Southwestern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Chatham under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 24th Kent Regiment this regiment previously having provided 98 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, the regiment also provided volunteers to the 18th Battalion. The 186th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel N. Smith (24th Kent Regiment), with a strength of 18 officers and 469 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 4th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks 186th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 15 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.200.

187th Battalion (Central Alberta). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 187th (Central Alberta) Battalion was recruited in Central Alberta with mobilization headquarters at Red Deer under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 35th Central Alberta Horse this previously having contributed 116 volunteers to the 5th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 187th Battalion embarked for England on 20 December 1916 with 24 officers and 744 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.W. Robinson (15th Light Horse). The battalion was absorbed into the 21st Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 187th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.201.

188th Battalion (Saskatchewan). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 188th (Saskatchewan) Battalion was recruited in Northern Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Prince Albert under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 52nd Regiment (Prince Albert Volunteers) this regiment previously having provided 150 volunteers to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and subsequently to the 53rd, 65th and 96th Infantry Battalions. The 188th Battalion embarked for England October 13th 1916 with 32 officers and 1004 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel S.J. Donaldson (Honorary rank), where in January 1917 amalgamated with other Saskatchewan battalions in England to form the 15th Reserve Battalion. The 188th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.202.

189th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 8 December 1917.

The 189th (Temiscouata and Rimouski) Battalion was recruited in Eastern Quebec by the 89th Temiscouata and Rimouski Regiment with mobilization headquarters at Fraserville under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The regiment having previously provided 15 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The 189th Battalion embarked for England on 27 September 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P.A. Piuze (C.A.), with a strength of 26 officers and 595 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with the 41st, 57th, 69th 150th and 178th Battalions to form the 10th Reserve Battalion under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. Des Rosiers. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 189th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 8 December 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.203.

190th Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 190th (Winnipeg Rifles) Battalion was the fourth infantry battalion raised and mobilized by the 90th Winnipeg Rifles, authorization being granted under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 190th battalion embarked for England on3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.K. Watson (90th Winnipeg Rifles), with a strength of 15 officers and 372 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 18th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 190th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1st September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.204.

191st Battalion (Southern Alberta). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 4 August 1917.

The 191st (South Alberta) Battalion was mobilized in Southern Alberta with mobilization headquarters at Fort McLeod under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 23rd Alberta Rangers this previously having contributed 78 volunteers to the 6th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The191st Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.C. Bryan (23rd Alberta Rangers), with a strength of 6 officers and 246 other ranks. In England the battalion was absorbed into the 21st Reserve Battalion this the reinforcing battalion of the Alberta Regiment supplying reinforcements to the 10th, 31st, 49th and 50th battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 191st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.205.

192nd Battalion (Crow's Nest Pass). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 12 Oct 1917.

The 192nd (Crow’s Nest Pass) Battalion was recruited in the Crow’s Nest Pass area straddling the borders of South Western Alberta and South-Eastern British Columbia with mobilization headquarters at Blairmore under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The 192nd Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.E. Lyon (23rd Alberta Rangers), with a strength of 23 officers and 424 other ranks where in January of 1917 it amalgamated with other Alberta Battalions to form the 21st Reserve Battalion. The 192nd Battalion was disbanded effective October 12th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

193rd Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 18 February 1918.

The 193rd (Nova Scotia Highlanders) Battalion was recruited by the 78th Pictou Highlanders and the 93rd Cumberland Regiment in Nova Scotia with mobilization headquarters at Truro under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Both regiments having previously contributed volunteers to the 13th and 17th Battalions on their formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, these regiments also later raised the 246th Battalion. The 193rd Battalion embarked for England October 13th 1916 with 32 officers and 1020 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Stanfield (76th Colchester and Hants Regiment, Honorary Colonel),where in January 1917 the 193rd Battalion amalgamated with other Nova Scotia Battalions to form the 17th Reserve Battalion this serving as the reinforcing battalion for the Nova Scotia Regiment supplying reinforcements to the 25th and 85th Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The193rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 18 February 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.206.

194th Battalion (Edmonton Highlanders). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 12 October 1917.

The 194th (Edmonton Highlanders) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Edmonton under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The battalion embarked for England November 14th 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.C. Craig (19th Alberta Dragoons) with a strength of 31 officers and 906 other ranks where in January 1917 it merged with the 9th Battalion, Training and Reserve on this being reorganized as the 9th Reserve Battalion. In September 1917 the 9th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 21st Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 194th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 27 October 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.207.

195th Battalion (City of Regina). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 195th (City of Regina) Battalion was recruited by the 60th Rifles of Canada and the 95th Saskatchewan Rifles these regiments previously having contributed 294 and 171 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The battalion mobilized at Regina, Saskatchewan under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. These two militia regiments also supplied volunteers to the 46th, 68th, 128th, and 152nd Battalions. The 195th Battalion embarked for England November 1st 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.C. Garner (Corps of Guides), with a strength of 31 officers and 998 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with the 32nd, 53rd, 188th and 195th Battalions with an additional draft from the 152nd battalion to form the 15th Reserve Battalion. The194th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded October 12th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.208.

196th Battalion (Western Universities). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 196th (Western Universities) Battalion was recruited from students and former students of a various universities located in the different Provinces of Western Canada. The battalion mobilized at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916 with volunteers also being attested at Saskatoon, Vancouver and Edmonton. The 196th Battalion embarked for England on 1 November  1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.S. MacKay (79th Cameron Highlanders), with a strength of 32 officers and 974 other ranks. In January 1917 the 196th Bn. amalgamated with other battalions raised in Western Canada to form the 19th Reserve Battalion. In October 1917 the 19th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 15th Reserve Battalion, which became the single reinforcing battalion for the Saskatchewan Regiment provided reinforcements to the 5th, 28th 46th and 1st CMR Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 196th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1st September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.209.

197th Battalion (Vikings of Canada). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 197th (Vikings of Canada) Battalion was recruited in Western Canada on 1 February 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion was raised without Canadian Militia affiliation and embarked for England on 26 January 1917 with nine officers and 306 OR’s under command of Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel H.G. Fonseca. (Presumably associated with a Scandinavian fraternal organization. A Lieutenant A.M.G. Fonseca is listed on the roles of the 90th Winnipeg Rifles.) By 1916 the flow of volunteers for the CEF was drying up and various ’specialty’ battalions were raised by appealing to different patriotic and ethnic nationalities. Two such Scandinavian battalions were raised in Canada this after the Germans had invaded the Danish Province of Schleswig-Holstien. After its arrival in England the 197th Battalion was absorbed into the 11th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 197th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.132.

198th Battalion (Canadian Buffs). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

The 198th (Canadian Buffs) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto in Mach 1916 being authorized under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The 198th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 with a strength of 31 officers and 841 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.A. Cooper (2nd Q.O.R.). The 198th Battalion was the fourth CEF battalion raised by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada this regiment having contributed 975 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later formed the 83rd, 95th and 166th Battalions, the Q.O.R. later went on to raise the 255th Battalion. Between February 1917 and March 1917 the 198th Battalion was assigned to the 15th Brigade 5th Canadian Division but withdrawn and merged into the 3rd Reserve Battalion in April 1917. The 198th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2894453)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.134.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.134.

199th Battalion (Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Canadian Rangers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 199th (Duchess of Connaught’s Own) Battalion was recruited by the 55th Irish Canadian Rangers at Montreal under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 55th Irish Canadian Rangers was one of a number of Militia Regiments raised after the start of the First World War to attest volunteers. Others regiments raised to organize CEF battalions were the 58th (Westmount) Rifles also located at Montreal, 70th Regiment at Hull Quebec, the 108th Regiment raised at Berlin, Ontario, this later renamed Kitchener, and the 109th and 110th Irish Regiment both from Toronto. The 199th Battalion embarked for England on 20 December 1916 with of 26 officers and 834 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.J. Trihey (55th Irish Canadian Rangers), where in February 1917 the battalion was assigned to the 15th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Division then in formation in England. Effective 17 May 1917 the 199th Battalion was removed from the establishment of the 5th Division and absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 199th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 15 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.135.

200th Battalion (Winnipeg). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 200th (Winnipeg) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Winnipeg in April 1917 under General Order 69 of 15 July 11916. (It would appear that this battalion was raised as an ad hoc battalion from conscripts or depot personnel.) the 200th Battalion embarked for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.L. Bonnycastle (Honorary rank), with a strength of 17 officers and 477 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 11th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 200th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.136.

201st Battalion (Toronto Light Infantry). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 12 July 1918.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. G. Hagarty. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Toronto. Recruited in Toronto. Was intended to be a temperance battalion of former school cadets. Broken up in Canada in September 1916. Personnel transferred to 170th and 198th Battalions. Disbanded under provision of section 22(2) of the Militia Act. Disbandment authorized by Privy Council Order 1727 of 12 July 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.176.

202nd Battalion (Sportsmens). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 18 February 1918.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel P. E. Bowen. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Edmonton. Recruited in the Edmonton district. Embarked from Halifax 24 November 1916 aboard Mauritania. Disembarked England on 30 November 1916. Strength: 27 officers, 773 other ranks.5th Division, 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 22 January - May 1917. Drafts of 206 to 10th Battalion, 283 to 31st Battalion, 32 to 49th Battalion and 290 to 50th Battalion in May 1917. Absorbed by 9th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 27 May 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 362 of 18 February 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.177.

203rd Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. E. Hansford. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Winnipeg. Recruited in Winnipeg. To be a temperance battalion. Embarked from Halifax 26 October 1916 aboard Grampian. Disembarked England 5 November 1916. Strength: 32 officers, 956 other ranks. Absorbed by 18th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 12 January 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2545 of 15 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.178.

204th Battalion (Beavers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Price. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July1916. Mobilized at Toronto. Recruited in Toronto. Embarked from Halifax 28 March 1917 aboard Saxonia. Disembarked England 7 April 1917. Strength: 27 officers, 788 other ranks. Absorbed by 2nd Canadian Reserve Battalion on 7 April 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 1895 of 17 July 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.179.

205th Battalion (Hamilton). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 12 July 1918.

Moody. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Hamilton. Recruited in Hamilton district. Disbanded in Canada by provision of Sec 22(2) of the Militia Act. Disbanded by authority of Privy Council Order 1727 of 12 July 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.180.

206th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 August 1918.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel T. Pagnuelo. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Montreal. Recruited in Beauharnais, Laprairie, Terrebonne, Montcalm, L’Assomption and Berthier counties. Disbanded in Canada on 9 August 1916 under provision of section 22(2) of the Militia Act. Drafts of 103 to 163rd Battalion at Bermuda and 50 to 150th and 189th Battalion. Disbanded officially by Privy Council Order 1727 of 27 July 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635561)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.181.

207th Battalion (Ottawa-Carleton). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Charles W. MacLean. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Ottawa. Recruited in Carleton County. Embarked from Halifax 2 June 1917 aboard Olympic. Disembarked England 9 June 1917. Strength: 27 officers, 652 other ranks. Absorbed by 7th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 10 June 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 3187 of 11 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.182.

208th Battalion (Canadian Irish). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

Lennox. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Toronto. Recruited in the Toronto district, beginning 17 March 1916. Embarked from Halifax 3 May 1917 aboard JUSTICIA. Disembarked England 14 May 1917. Strength: 27 officers, 686 other ranks. 5th Division, 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 27 May 1917 - 11 January 1918. “A” and “B” companies absorbed by 8th Canadian Reserve Battalion and “C”, “D” and “E” companies absorbed by 2nd Canadian Reserve Battalion on 11January 1918. Disbanded by General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.183.

209th Battalion (Swift Current). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 21 May 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. D. Smyth. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Swift Current. Recruited in the Swift Current district. Embarked from Halifax 1 November 1916 aboard Caronia. Disembarked England 11 November 1916. Strength: 29 officers, 915 other ranks. Draft of 160 to 102nd Battalion in December 1916. Absorbed by 9th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 4 January 1917. Disbanded 4 June 1917 by Privy Council Orders 1366 and 1863 of 21 May and 6 July 1917.

210th Battalion (Frontiersmen). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

Organized in March 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel F. Pawlett. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Moose Jaw. Recruited in the Moose Jaw district. Embarked from Halifax 11 April 1917 aboard CARPATHIA. Disembarked England 22 April 1917. Strength: 18 officers, 462 other ranks. Absorbed by 19th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 22 April 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.184.

211th Battalion (American Legion). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 21 March 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. M. Sage. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Vancouver. Recruited in Alberta and British Columbia. Special appeal made to American citizens and former citizens resident in Canada. Embarked from Halifax 20 December 1916 aboard OLYMPIC. Disembarked England 26 December 1916. Strength: 25 officers, 662 other ranks. Absorbed by 26th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 20 January 1917 and then by Canadian Railway Troops Depot on 16 February 1917. Amalgamated with 218th Battalion on 21 March 1917 to form 8th Battalion Canadian Railway Troops.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.185.

212th Battalion (American Legion). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 8 October 1916.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Major B. C. Pitman. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Winnipeg. Recruited in Manitoba. Absorbed by 97th Battalion on 12 September 1916. Disbanded in Canada on 8 October 1916 (General Order 114 of December 1916).

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.186.

213th Battalion (American Legion). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel R. J. Bates. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at St. Catharines. Recruited in Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. First draft left Halifax 20 December 1916 aboard OLYMPIC. Disembarked England 26 December 1916. Strength: 3 officers, 99 other ranks. Second draft left Halifax 26 January 1917 aboard GRAMPIAN. Arrived in England 6 February 1917. Strength: 2 officers, 85 other ranks. Both drafts absorbed by 25th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 7 February 1917. Disbanded by General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.187.

214th Battalion (Saskatchewan). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Hearn. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Wadena, Saskatchewan. Recruited in the Districts of Mackenzie and Humboldt. Embarked from Halifax 18 April 1917 aboard GRAMPIAN. Disembarked England 29 April 1917.Strength: 20 officers, 595 other ranks. Absorbed by 15th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 29 April 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2019 of 27 July 1917.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3667306)

215th Battalion (2nd Overseas Battalion of the 38th Regiment Dufferin Rifles). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. E. Snider. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Brantford. Recruited in Brant, Norfolk and Haldimand counties. Embarked from Halifax 29 April 1917 aboard Olympic. Disembarked England 7 May 1917. Strength: 16 officers, 327 other ranks. Absorbed by 2nd Canadian Reserve Battalion on 7 May 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.192.

216th Battalion (Bantams). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel F. H. Burton. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Toronto. Recruited in the Toronto district amongst men 5 feet to 5 feet 2 in. in height. Embarked from Halifax 18 April 1917 aboard Scandinavian. Disembarked in England on 29 April 1917. Strength: 30 officers, 793 other ranks. Absorbed by 3rd Canadian Reserve Battalion on 29 April 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.189.

217th Battalion (Qu'Appelle). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. B. Gillis. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Moosomin. Recruited in eastern Saskatchewan. Embarked from Halifax 2 June 1917 aboard OLYMPIC. Disembarked England on 9 June 1917. Strength: 24 officers, 634 other ranks. Absorbed by 19th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 9 June 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2342 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.190.

218th Battalion (Edmonton). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 5 April 1918.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. W.H. McKinery. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Edmonton. Recruited in Edmonton. Converted to a railway construction battalion on 21 January 1917. First draft left Halifax 17 February 1917 aboard Southland. Embarked from England 27 February 1917. Second draft left Halifax 4 March 1917 aboard Ausona. Disembarked England 15 March 1917. Total strength: 27 officers, 621 other ranks. Absorbed by Canadian Railway Troops Depot, Purfleet on 8 March 1917. Amalgamated with 211th Battalion on 21 March 1917 to form 8th Battalion Canadian Railway Troops. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 532 of 5 April 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

219th Highland Battalion (Nova Scotia). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

Organized in February 1916 under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Muirhead. Authorization published in General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. Mobilized at Aldershot, Nova Scotia. Recruited in western Nova Scotia, the Annapolis Valley and Halifax. Embarked from Halifax 13 October 1916 aboard Olympic. Disembarked England 19 October 1916. Strength: 33 officers, 1001 other ranks. Absorbed by 17th Canadian Reserve Battalion on 23 January 1917. Disbanded by Privy Council Order 2545 of 15 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.191.

220th Battalion (12th Regiment York Rangers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 220th (York Rangers) Battalion was recruited and mobilized at Toronto from the 12th York Rangers under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 this regiment having previously contributed 273 volunteers to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised or provided volunteers to the 20th, 81st, 83rd, and 127th Battalions. The 220th Battalion embarked for England on 29 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel B.H. Brown (12th York Rangers), with a strength of 18 officers and 446 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 3rd Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 220th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.272.

221st Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 4 August 1917.

The 221st (Manitoba Bulldogs) Battalion was recruited in Manitoba with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg on 24 February 1916 under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion did not have a militia affiliation embarking for England on18 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel V.A.V. McMeans (34th Fort Garry Horse) with a strength of 23 officers and 596 ORs where the battalion was absorbed into the 11th Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 221st Canadian Infantry Battalion  effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.273.

222nd Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 222nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited by the 106th Winnipeg Light Infantry with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg on 22 February 1916 under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The regiment having previously provided 665 volunteers to the 10th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914, later providing volunteers to the 61st Battalion and then raising the 101st and 226th Battalions. The 222nd Battalion embarked for England on 13 November 1916 with 32 officers and 993 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Lightfoot (106th Winnipeg Light Infantry); where in January 1917 the battalion amalgamated with other battalions raised in Military Area No.10 (at that time encompassing both Manitoba and Saskatchewan), then in England to form the 19th Reserve Battalion this under command of Lieutenant-Colonel D.S. MacKay. In October 1917 the 19th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 15th Reserve Battalion this becoming the sole reinforcing battalion for the Saskatchewan Regiment, authorized under General Order 77 of 15 May 1918 and providing reinforcements to the 5th, 28th 46th and 1st CMR Battalions serving with the Canadian Corps on the Western Front. The 222nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1993.28.274.

223rd Battalion (Canadian Scandinavians). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 223rd (Canadian Scandinavians) Battalion was recruited in all four Western Provinces without militia regiment association. Formed with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg under General Order 69 of July15th 1916. The battalion embarked for England on 3 May 1917 with a strength of 17 officers and 507 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. O.A. Albrechsten (52nd Prince Albert Volunteers); where the battalion was absorbed into the 11th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 223rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Archives of Ontario, Photo I0016176)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28..

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.275.

224th Canadian Forestry Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 18 Feb 1918.

A request from the Imperial Government in England for skilled lumbermen to process forests in the British Isles thus freeing shipping from transporting finished lumber saw the 224th Canadian Forestry Battalion being raised in Canada. The battalion was recruited from across Canada with mobilization headquarters at Ottawa on 26 February 1916 being authorized under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion embarked for England in drafts with around 400 all ranks. The full battalion of 47 Officers and 1526 OR’s by 19 May 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. McDougall (3rd Field Company C.E.). The 224th Battalion had just arrived in England and commenced work when an urgent request was made by the British Government for more Canadian lumbermen. A telegram received at Ottawa May 16th 1916requested a further 2000 lumbermen as soon as possible. The 238th and 242nd Forestry Battalions were raised and equipped with mills and shipped to England in drafts. In November 1916 the 230th Battalion was also converted to a Forestry Battalion but the demands for lumbermen continued unabated. In December 1916 officers in England went to the CEF Reserve Bases to find experienced lumbermen who were transferred to the CFC. Consideration was also given to converting the 119th and 156th Battalions in England from Infantry to Forestry Battalions.

In November 1916 the timber operations were gathered under the Director of Canadian Timber Operations as the Canadian Forestry Corps at which time the former CEF Infantry Battalion structure was replaced with Forestry Companies. Each of these with six Officers, 14 Sergeants and 171 OR’s with attached laborers of approximately 150 to 200 unskilled labourers provided from various British Colonies as well as the Chinese Labour Corps, South African Labour Corps, Russian Labour Corps and Prisoner of War Companies. By the end of December 1916 there were 103 Officers and 2303 OR’s working in England and a further 30 Officers and 602 OR’s in France. By the time of the Armistice there were 60 Companies working in France and 41 in Great Britain. Depending on the area from which they were drawn Forestry companies specialized in cutting different types of soft and hard wood forests. Some Companies in France cutting Spruce exclusively for aircraft production. In addition to lumber production other companies worked in quarries cutting stone and in the construction of air fields.  Being fully depleted of all ranks the 224th Canadian Forestry Battalion (which specialized in cutting Beech forests), was disbanded under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.276.

Canadian Forestry Battalion Overseas.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.277.

225th Battalion (Kootenay). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 225th (Kootenay) Battalion was recruited by the 107th East Kootenay Regiment in the lower British Columbia interior at Fernie, Cranbrook, Nelson and Grand Forks with mobilization headquarters at Fernie under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The regiment previously providing a large detachment from both the East and West Kootenay’s these had providing 310 volunteers to the 7th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. The regiment later raised the 54th Battalion. The 225th Battalion embarked for England January 25th 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. Mackay (107th East Kootenay Regiment), with a strength of 20 officers and 427 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 1st Reserve Battalion. Being fully deleted of all ranks the 225th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 17th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.278.

226th Battalion (Men of the North). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1917.

The 226th Battalion was recruited in Manitoba with mobilization headquarters at Dauphin under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 by the 106th Winnipeg Light Infantry. The 226th Battalion embarked for England on 15 December 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.A. Gillespie (106th Winnipeg Light Infantry), with a strength of 32 officers and 1035 other ranks where in January 1917 it amalgamated with other Manitoba Battalions to form the 14th Reserve Battalion. In October 1917 the 14th Reserve Battalion was absorbed by the 11th Reserve Battalion. The 226th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.279.

227th Battalion (Sudbury-Manitoulin-Algoma). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 227th (Men of the North) Battalion CEF was recruited on Manotoulin Island and the Algoma district of Northern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Sault Ste. Marie, the battalion assembling at Camp Borden, under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 227th Battalion was raised by the 51st Regiment (Soo Rifles) this regiment previously having contributed 126 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 119th Battalion. The 227th Battalion embarked for England on 11 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.H. Le P. Jones (51st Soo Rifles), with a strength of 28 officers and 783 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 8th Reserve. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 227th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

228th Battalion (Northern Fusiliers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 23 October 1920.

The 228th (Northern Fusiliers) Battalion was recruited by the 97th Algonquin Rifles in the Nippising and Sudbury areas of Northern Ontario with mobilization headquarters at North Bay under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The regiment previously having provided 263 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 159th and 256th Railway Construction Battalion. The 228th Battalion embarked for England on 16 February 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. Earchman (34th Ontario Regiment), with a strength of 31 officers and 756 other ranks. On 8 March 1917 the battalion was sent to the Canadian Railway Troops Depot at Purfleet being redesignated as the 6th Battalion Railway Troops. The Battalion sailed for France during the first week of April 1917 and served on the Western Front until the Armistice in November 1918. The 228th Battalion is not listed as being disbanded as an infantry battalion in the General Orders but the 6th Canadian Railway Troops was disbanded along with the rest of the Canadian Railway Troops under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.255.

229th Battalion (South Saskatchewan). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 229th (South Saskatchewan) Battalion was recruited in southern Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Moose Jaw under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 229th Battalion embarked for England on 18 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.D. Pickett (60th Rifles of Canada), with a strength of 17 officers and 426 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 15th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 229th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 15 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

230th Battalion (Voltigeurs Canadiens Français). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 230th (Voltigeurs Canadiens Français) Battalion was authorized to be raised as an infantry battalion under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916 by the 70th Hull Regiment. The 230th Battalion was raised in the area surrounding Ottawa in both Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec from mainly French speaking forestry workers with mobilization headquarters at Hull. On November 6th 1916 the battalion was converted from an infantry to a forestry battalion after an urgent request from the Imperial Government in England for more skilled lumbermen. The 230th Forestry Battalion embarked for England on 23 January 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.de Salaberry (G.G.F.G.), with a strength of 18 officers and 687 other ranks where it was absorbed into the Canadian Forestry Corps. The 230th Battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1918 under General Order 102 of 15 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.256.

231st Battalion (Seaforth Highlanders of Canada). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 231st (Seaforth Highlanders of Canada) Battalion was recruited by the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada with mobilization headquarters at Vancouver under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada had previously having provided 542 volunteers to the 16th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 72nd Battalion. The 231st Battalion embarked for England on 11 April 1917 with 28 officers and 661 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.E. Leach. (72nd Seaforth Highlanders), (Photographs of the 231st show only Lieutenant-Colonel Leach wearing a Glengarry cap all other officers and men wear the Balmoral bonnet.) After its arrival in England the 231st Battalion was absorbed by the 1st Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 231st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 4 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.258.

232nd Battalion (Saskatchewan). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 12 Oct 1917.

The 232nd (Saskatchewan) Battalion was recruited in the area surrounding Battleford in Saskatchewan with mobilization Headquarters at Battleford under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The 232nd Battalion was raised in part by 52nd Prince Albert Volunteers and the 105th Regiment (Saskatoon Fusiliers) these regiments previously having provided 150 and 255 volunteers respectively to the 11th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914. These regiments also later helped raise the 53rd 65th, 96th,and 188th Battalions. The 232nd Battalion embarked for England on 18 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel R.P. Laurie with a strength of 13 officers and 286 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed by the 15th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 232nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective October 12th 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.259.

233rd Battalion (Canadiens Français du Nord-Ouest). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 233rd (Canadiens Français) Battalion was authorized to be raised in Alberta on 14 March 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel E.T. Leprohon (65th Carabiniers Mont-Royal), as a French speaking battalion with mobilization headquarters at Edmonton under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The battalion was only able to raise a minimal number of recruits and these were merged into the 178th Battalion which itself was never able to reach battalion strength the personnel being sent to England in Drafts where they were absorbed into the 10th Reserve Battalion. The 10th Reserve Battalion served as the reinforcing battalion for the 22nd Battalion, the only French speaking battalion of the 48 serving with the Canadian Corps in France. The 233rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was carried on the rolls until being disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.260.

234th Battalion (Peel). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 234th (Peel) Battalion was recruited by the 36th Peel Regiment and 20th Halton Rifles in Central Ontario with mobilization headquarters at Toronto under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. These regiments had previously contributed 230 and 171 volunteers respectively to the 4th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later helped to raise the 37th, 74th, 76th 126th and 164th Battalions. The 234th Battalion embarked for England on 18 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. Wallace (14th Infantry Brigade), with a strength of 15 officers and 279 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed by the 12th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 234th Peel Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.261.

235th Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 235th Canadian Infantry Battalion was mobilized with headquarters at Belleville under General Order69 of July 15th 1916 being recruited by the 40th Northumberland Regiment in Northumberland and Durham Counties in Central Ontario. The regiment previously having contributed 81 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later raising the 139th Battalion. The 235th Battalion embarked for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel S.B. Scobel (19th Lincoln Regiment), with a strength of 19 officers and 438 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 3rdReserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635553)

Kilties recruiting poster.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395503)

Canadian Kilties drawing water to take to the chums in the line in lens. September 1917.

236th Battalion (New Brunswick Kilties). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 30 August 1920.

The 236th (New Brunswick Kilties) Battalion, nicknamed ‘Sir Sam‘s Own’ was authorized to be raised in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Fredericton under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916The 236th Battalion was one of three battalions to be raised primarily by the 74th Regiment (The New Brunswick Rangers) this regiment previously having contributed 73 volunteers to the 12th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later the 55th and 145th Battalions. By mid 1916 the available supply of volunteers for the CEF had slowed down to just a trickle particularly in smaller rural areas. Recruiting for the 236th Battalion was going slowly until the ever energetic Sir Sam Hughes made as wing through the Northern United States with the Pipes and Drums of the 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada (The Black Watch) after which the ranks of the 236th were quickly filled with expatriate Britons and Americans of Scottish ancestry. In honour of the American volunteers a new Balmoral badge was introduced with the motto ‘MacLean Kilties of America ‘ replacing the former ‘The New Brunswick Kilties’. The 236th Battalion sailed for England November 17th 1917 with a strength of 27 officers and 1029 other ranks under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P.A. Guthrie (71st York Regiment), this number included the 247th Battalion raised in the counties of Victoria and Haliburton, Ontario, Sir Sam Hughes’s own political riding in which recruiting had dried up completely. In February 1917 the 236th was tentatively assigned to the 5th Canadian Division but was withdrawn in May 1917 and absorbed into the 20th Reserve Battalion, this the reinforcing battalion for the 13th and 42nd (Black Watch) Battalions serving in the field with the Canadian Corps in France and Flanders. The pipes and drums of the 236thamalgamated with other pipe bands to form the pipe and drums of the 20th Reserve Battalion. The 236th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

237th Battalion (American Legion). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 8 October 1916.

The 237th (New Brunswick Americans) Battalion was authorized to be raised in New Brunswick with mobilization headquarters at Sussex under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Reverend C.S. Bullock. The battalion however was unable to attract enough recruits to sail to England as an independent battalion and was therefore disbanded in Canada and the volunteers reassigned to the 97th Battalion to bring this up to strength prior to its sailing for England in September1916. The 237th Canadian Infantry Battalion disbanded October 8th 1916 under General Order 114 of 1 December 1916.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.262.

238th Canadian Forestry Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 1609 man 224th Battalion had only just arrived in England and commenced work when an urgent request was made by the British Government for more Canadian lumbermen. A telegram received at Ottawa on 16 May 1916 requested a further 2000 lumbermen as soon as possible. The 238th and 242nd Forestry Battalions were raised and equipped with mills and shipped to England in Drafts. In November 1916 the 230th Battalion was also converted to a Forestry Battalion but the demands for lumbermen continued unabated. In December 1916 officers in England went to the CEF Reserve Bases to find experienced lumbermen who were transferred to the CFC. Consideration was also given to converting the119th and 156th Battalions in England from Infantry to Forestry Battalions. In November 1916 the timber operations were gathered under the Director of Canadian Timber Operations as the Canadian Forestry Corps at which time the former CEF Infantry Battalion structure was replaced with Forestry Companies. Each of these with six Officers, 14 Sergeants and 171 OR’s with attached laborers of approximately 150 to200 unskilled laborers provided from various British Colonies as well as the Chinese Labour Corps, Russian Labour Corps and Prisoner of War Companies. By the end of December 1916 there were 103 Officers and2303 OR’s working in England and a further 30 Officers and 602 OR’s in France. By the time of the Armistice there were 60 Companies working in France and 41 in Great Britain. Depending on the area from which they were drawn Forestry companies specialized in cutting different types of soft and hard wood forests. Some Companies in France cutting Spruce exclusively for aircraft production. In addition to lumber production other companies worked cutting stone in quarries and constructing air fields. The 238th Canadian Forestry Battalion was recruited from volunteers from Ontario and Quebec with mobilization headquarters at Camp Valcartier being authorized under General Order 69 of July 1916. The ranks of the battalion were quickly filled and the unit sailed for England in September 1916 in a series of Drafts of 200 each complete with its own mill and transport under overall command of Lieutenant -Colonel W.R. Smyth (Honorary rank), the total compliment of the 238th Battalion being 44 officers and 1081 other ranks. After its arrival in England and the compulsory 14 weeks of infantry training given to all soldiers ofthe CEF, the 238th battalion was assigned to the Canadian Forestry Corps. A number of the Companies formed from the 238th Battalion almost immediately being transferred to France. The 238th Forestry Battalion specialized in cutting pine whereas the 224th Forestry Battalion concentrated mainly on Beech forests.

239th Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 239th Overseas Railway Construction Battalion was recruited from skilled railway personnel from Ontario and Quebec with mobilization headquarters at Camp Valcartier on 5 May 1916 under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The battalion embarked for England on 15 December 1916 under command of Lieutenant -Colonel J.B.L. MacDonald (C.E.), with a strength of 26 officers and 738 OR’s. After its arrival the 239th Overseas Construction Corps was redesignated as the 3rd Battalion Canadian Railway Troops sailing for France on 22 March 1917 where the unit served for the duration of the war. The 239th Overseas Railway Construction Battalion was disbanded under General Order 149 of 15 September 1920. The 3rd Battalion Canadian Railway Troops under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.263.

240th Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 240th (Lanark and Renfrew) Battalion was recruited by the 42nd Lanark and Renfrew Regiment in the Counties of Lanark, Renfrew and Frontenac with mobilization headquarters at Renfrew under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The regiment previously having provided 128 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later contributed volunteers to many battalions raised in Eastern Ontario as well as raising the 130th Battalion. The 240th Battalion embarked for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel E.J. Watt (42nd Lanark and Renfrew Regiment), with a strength of 14 officers and 375 other ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 6th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 240th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective September 1st 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.264.

241st Battalion (Canadian Scottish Borderers). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 241st (Canadian Scottish Borderers) Battalion was raised by the 21st Essex Fusiliers from recruits of Scottish ancestry from South Western Ontario and Michigan with mobilization headquarters at Windsor, Ontario June 2nd 1916 being authorized under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The regiment previously having provided 229 volunteers to the 1st Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and providing volunteers to the 18th Battalion and later raised the 99th Battalion. The 241st Battalion embarked for England on 29 April 1917 with 21 officers and 625 OR’s under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.L. McGregor (21st Essex Fusiliers), where the battalion was absorbed into the 12th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 241st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635546)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.265.

242nd Forestry Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 29 November 1918.

A 1609 man 224th Battalion had only just arrived in England and commenced work when an urgent request was made by the British Government for more Canadian lumbermen. A telegram received at Ottawa on 16 May 1916 requested a further 2000 lumbermen as soon as possible. The 238th and 242nd Forestry Battalions were raised and equipped with mills and shipped to England in drafts. In November 1916 the230th Battalion was also converted to a Forestry Battalion but the demands for lumbermen continued unabated. In December 1916 officers in England went to the CEF Reserve Bases to find experienced lumbermen who were transferred to the CFC. Consideration was also given to converting the 119th and156th Battalions in England from Infantry to Forestry Battalions. In November 1916 the timber operations were gathered under the Director of Canadian Timber Operations as the Canadian Forestry Corps at which time the former CEF Infantry Battalion structure was replaced with Forestry Companies. Each of these with six Officers, 14 Sergeants and 171 OR’s with attached labourers of approximately 150 to 200 unskilled laborers provided from various British Colonies as well as the Chinese Labor Corps, Russian Labour Corps and Prisoner of War Companies. By the end of December 1916 there were 103 Officers and 2303 OR’s working in England and a further 30 Officers and 602 OR’s in France. By the time of the Armistice there were 60 Companies working in France and 41 in Great Britain. Depending on the area from which they were drawn Forestry companies specialized in cutting different types of soft and hard wood forests. Some Companies in France cutting Spruce exclusively for aircraft production. In addition to lumber production other companies worked cutting stone in quarries and constructing air fields. The 242nd Canadian Forestry Battalion war raised in Quebec in June 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Montreal under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion embarked for England in drafts during November 1916 under overall command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.B. White (17th Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars), with a total strength of 44 officers and 1006 OR’s. The 242nd Canadian Forestry Battalion was disbanded on 29 November 1918 under General Order 135 of 16 December 1918.

(Doug Hall Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

243rd Battalion. Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 243rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Northern Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Prince Albert June 6th 1916 under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion which did not have a militia affiliation embarked for England on 2 June 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.E. Bradshaw (Honorary rank), with a strength of 16 officers and 391 OR’s where it was absorbed into the 15th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 243rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 11 April 1918 under General Order 82 of 1June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3635549)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.266.

244th Battalion (Kitchener's Own). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 244th (Kitchener’s Own) Battalion was recruited in Quebec June 6th 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Montreal under General Order 69 of July 15th 1916. The battalion was raised by the 3rdVictoria Rifles of Canada the regiment previously having provided 351 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 later raising the 24th and 60th Battalions. The 244th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel F.M. McRobie (3rd Victoria Rifles of Canada), with a strength of 27 officers and 604 OR’s where the battalion was absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 244th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 27 July 1917 under General Order 89 of 1 September 1917.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

245th Battalion (Canadian Grenadier Guards). Authorized on 15 July 1916, disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 245th (Canadian Grenadier Guards) Battalion was raised and mobilized at Montreal June 6th 1916 under General Order 69 of 15 July 1916. The battalion was raised by the 1st Regiment, the Grenadier Guards of Canada this previously having provided 350 volunteers to the 14th Battalion on is formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 87th Battalion this serving in the 11th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division. The 245th Battalion embarked for England on 3 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.C. Ballantyne with a strength of 16 officers and 274 OR’s where it was absorbed into the 23rd Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 245th was disbanded effective 17 July 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.266.

246th Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 246th (Nova Scotia Highlanders) Battalion was recruited in Nova Scotia with mobilization headquarters at Halifax under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The battalion embarked for England on 2 June 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel N.H. Parsons (14th Hussars) with a strength of 14 officers and 233 other ranks where it was absorbed into the 17th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 246th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 11 April 1918 under GO 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.85.

247th Battalion (Victoria & Haliburton). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 11 April 1918.

The 247th (Victoria and Haliburton) (Diehard’s) Battalion began recruiting at Peterborough, West Hastings and Gavin township with mobilization headquarters at Peterborough August 15th 1916 under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The regiment was raised by the 45th Victoria and Halliburton Regiment the designation being changed from the 45th Victoria Regiment July 1st 1917. Victoria and Haliburton was the seat held by Sir Sam Hughes in the Canadian Parliament. The 45th Victoria Regiment had previously provided 45 volunteers to the 2nd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 109th Battalion. The 247th Battalion was raised under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.H. Ackerman (57th Peterborough Rangers) but was only able to raise a minimal number of recruits these being merged into the 236th Battalion (Sir Sam’s Own), which embarked for England 3 May 1917. The 247th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

248th Battalion. Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 248th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Grey County with mobilization headquarters at Owen Sound August 31st 1916 under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The battalion was raised by the 31st Grey Regiment this previously having contributed 83 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raised the 147th Battalion. The 248th Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.H. Rorke (McGill COTC), with a strength of 13 officers and 259 OR’s where it was absorbed into the 7th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 248th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 17 September  1917 under General Order 82 of June 1918.

249th Battalion (Saskatchewan). Authorized on 1 February 1917, disbanded on 27 July 1918.

The 249th Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited in Saskatchewan with mobilization headquarters at Regina being authorized under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The battalion embarked for England on 21 February 1917 prior to its official date of authorization with a strength of 15 officers and 709 other ranks in under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C.B. Keenlyside (95th Saskatchewan Rifles), where it was absorbed into the 15th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 249th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 101 of 15 August 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.270.

250th Battalion (Winnipeg). Authorized on 1 February 1917, disbanded on 12 July 1918.

The 250th (White Eagles) Battalion was authorized to be raised in Manitoba from volunteers of Polish and Russian extraction September 12th 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg. The battalion was under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. Hastings (34th Fort Gary Horse), being authorized under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The 250th Battalion was only able to raise a minimal number of recruits and these were merged into the 249th Battalion prior to its embarking for England on3 May 1917. The 250th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded under General Order 101 of 15 August 1918.

251st Battalion (Goodfellows). Authorized on 1 February 1917, disbanded on 12 July 1918.

The 251st ‘Good Fellows’ Battalion was recruited in Manitoba with mobilization headquarters at Winnipeg on 12 September 1916 under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The battalion did not have a militia affiliation and embarked for England on 6 October 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.H. Nicholson with a strength of four officers and 170 OR’s ranks where the battalion was absorbed into the 18th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 251st Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 12 July 1918 under General Order 98 of 1 June 1918.

252nd Battalion (Lindsay). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 252nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was recruited September 12th 1916 in the Counties of Victoria and Haliburton, the Parliamentary seat of Sir Sam Hughes, with mobilization headquarters at Lindsay under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel J.J. Glass (45th Victoria Regiment), with a strength of just six officers and 127 OR’s where the battalion was absorbed into the 6th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 252nd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 1 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.267.

253rd Battalion (Queen's University Highland Battalion). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 8 December 1917.

The 253rd (Queen’s University Highlanders) Battalion the battalion was recruited partially from faculty and students of Queens University at Kingston on 25 October 1916 under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The 253rd Battalion embarked for England on 29 April 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P.G.C. Campbell (14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles), with a strength of 17 officers and 461 OR’s where the battalion was absorbed into the 5th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 253rd Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded 8 December 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum, Bella Doherty Photo)

1997.28.268.

254th Battalion (Quinte's Own). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 15 September 1917.

The 254th (Quinte’s Own) Battalion was recruited in Central Ontario on 6 November 1916 with mobilization headquarters at Bellville under General Order 48 of May 1st 1917. The battalion was raised by the 14th Princess of Wales Own Rifles, 15th Argyll Light Infantry, the 16th Prince Edward Regiment and the 49th Hastings Rifles, all counties located on Lake Ontario’s Bay of Quinte. The battalion embarked for England on 1 May 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel A.P. Allen (15th Argyll Light Infantry), with a strength of eight officers and 243 OR’s where the battalion was absorbed into the 6th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 248th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded effective 15 September 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

1997.28.269.

255th Battalion (Queen's Own Rifles of Canada). Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 1 September 1917.

The 255th (Queen’s Own Rifles) Battalion was recruited by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada with mobilization headquarters at Toronto on 22 November 1916 under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. This the fifth battalion to be raised primarily by the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada who had previously contributed 975 volunteers to the 3rd Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later formed the 83rd, 95th, 166th, and 198th Battalions. The 255th Battalion embarked for England June 2nd 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel G.C. Royce (2nd Q.O.R.), with a strength of 13 officers and 284 OR’s where the battalion was absorbed into the 12th Reserve Battalion. Being fully depleted of all ranks the 255th Canadian Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 8 December 1917 under General Order 82 of 1 June 1918.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3667114)

256th Battalion. Authorized on 1 May 1917, disbanded on 23 October 1920.

The 256th Overseas Infantry Battalion was raised in Northern Ontario as a specialized railway construction battalion with mobilization headquarters at the Exhibition Grounds, Toronto under General Order 48 of 1 May 1917. The actual date of formation is currently undetermined but the badge design was forwarded to Ottawa January 27th 1917, and approved on 6 February 1917. The 256th Battalion was raised by the 97th Algonquin Rifles the regiment previously having provided 263 volunteers to the 15th Battalion on its formation at Camp Valcartier in August 1914 and later raising the 159th and 228th Battalions. The 256th Battalion embarked for England on 28 March 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. McConnell (109th Regiment), with a strength of 18 officers and 531 OR’s where it was assigned to the Canadian Railway Troops Depot at Purfleet. The 256th Battalion was designated as the 10th Battalion Canadian Railway Troops under General Order 63 of June 15th 1917 sailing for France on 9 June 1917 where it served on the Western Front until the Armistice in November 1918. The 10th Battalion Canadian Railway Troops was disbanded along with the rest of the Canadian Railway Troops under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920.

257th Battalion. Authorized on 1 February 1917, disbanded on 1 November 1920.

The battalion embarked for England on 16 February 1917 under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L.T. Martin (43rd Duke of Cornwall’s Own Rifles), with a strength of 29 officers and 902 OR’s where on 8 March 1917 it was redesignated as the 7th Battalion Canadian Railway Troops. The Battalion sailed for France during the first week of April 1917 and served on the Western Front until the Armistice in November 1918. The unit was disbanded along with the rest of the Canadian Railway Troops under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920.

(York Sunbury Historical Society, Fredericton Region Museum Collection, Author Photo)

258th Battalion (Canadien Français). Authorized on 15 June 1917, disbanded on 17 October 1917.

The 258th Battalion was recruited as the Ruthenian Railway Construction Company in the Province of Quebec under General Order 63 of June 1917. The Ruthenian’s were an ethnic/religious group of the Eastern Orthodox sect and are generally associated with the Ukraine and Northern Romania. The unit mobilized at Quebec City under command of Lieutenant-Colonel P.E. Blondin (Honorary rank), with a strength of 16 officers and 215 OR’s being formed from railway employees in Military District No. 5. The 258th Battalion embarked for England October 16th 1917 where they redesignated as a Forestry Company. The 258th Battalion was disbanded under General Order 196 of 1 November 1920. (This was the General Order disbanding the Railway units of the CEF.)

 

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