Dieppe Raid, Operation Jubiliee, 19 August 1942

Dieppe Raid, Operation Jubiliee, 19 August 1942

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194300)

Infantrymen of The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada going ashore during Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe, France, 19 August 1942.

Operation Jubilee or the Dieppe Raid (19 August 1942) was an Allied amphibious attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe in northern France, during the Second World War. Over 6,050 infantry, predominantly Canadian, supported by a regiment of tanks, were put ashore from a naval force operating under protection of RAF and RCAF fighters.

The port was to be captured and held for a brief period, to evaluate the feasibility of a landing and to gather intelligence. German coastal defences, port structures and important buildings were to be demolished. The raid was intended to boost Allied morale, demonstrate the commitment of the Allied Forces tore-open the Western Front and support the Soviet Union, fighting on the Eastern Front.

Aerial and naval support was insufficient to enable the ground forces to achieve their objectives; the tanks were trapped on the beach and the infantry was largely prevented from entering the town by obstacles and German fire. After less than six hours, mounting casualties forced a retreat. The operation could not be completed, with only one landing force achieving its objective and some intelligence including electronic intelligence was gathered.

Within ten hours, 3,623 of the 6,086 men who landed had been killed, wounded or became prisoners of war. The German Luftwaffe made a maximum effort against the landing as the RAF had expected, but the RAF lost 106 aircraft (at least 32 to anti-aircraft fire or accidents) against 48 German losses. The Royal Navy lost 33 landing craft and a destroyer.

Both sides learned important lessons regarding coastal assaults. The Allies learned lessons that influenced the success of the D-Day landings. Artificial harbours were declared crucial, tanks were adapted specifically for beaches, a new integrated tactical air force strengthened ground support, and capturing a major port at the outset was no longer seen as a priority. Churchill and Mountbatten both claimed that these lessons had outweighed the cost. The Germans also believed that Dieppe was a learning experience and made a considerable effort to improve the way they defended the occupied coastlines of Europe. (Wikipedia)

There is a considerable amount of detailed data on the Internet.  The aim of this page is to include a few photos that may not have been seen before.

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/dieppe-raid

https://www.junobeach.org/canada-in-wwii/articles/the-dieppe-raid/

https://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/newspapers/operations/dieppe_e.html.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194482)

Canadian infantrymen disembarking from a landing craft during a training exercise before Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe, France. England, August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193843)

Troops in landing craft with a Universal Carrier preparing to go ashore during Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe, France 19 August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3192395)

Landing craft en route to Dieppe, France, during Operation Jubilee, 19 August 1942,

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193844)

Soldiers who took part in Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe, returning to England, 19 August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193838)

Disembarkation of wounded troops during Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe, 19 August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3378723)

Troops returning from Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3192368)

Bodies of Canadian soldiers lying among damaged landing craft and Churchill tanks of the Calgary Regiment following Operation Jubilee.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194753)

German troops examining a Churchill" tank of the Calgary Regiment abandoned during the raid on Dieppe, 19 August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193839)

Unidentified Hunt- class destroyer of the Royal Navy bombarding Dieppe during Operation Jubilee, 19 August 1942.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193840)

Douglas Boston Mk, III, No. 88 Squadron, RAF on the Dieppe Raid.