Germany: Luftwaffe Warplanes, 1939-1945: Heinkel

Deutsche Kampfflugzeuge der Luftwaffe 1939-1945: Heinkel

German Warplanes flown by the Luftwaffe 1939-1945: Heinkel

During and after the end of the Second War a number of German Warplanes were captured and evaluated by the Allied forces.  Most of these aircraft were later scrapped and therefore only a handful have survived.  This is a partial list of aircraft that were known to have been flown by the Luftwaffe.

Während und nach dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs wurden eine Reihe deutscher Kampfflugzeuge von den Alliierten erbeutet und ausgewertet.  Die meisten dieser Flugzeuge wurden später verschrottet und daher haben nur eine Handvoll überlebt. Dies ist eine unvollständige Liste von Flugzeugen, von denen bekannt war, dass sie von der Luftwaffe geflogen wurden.

Heinkel HD 37 fighter biplane (used only by Soviets).  (SDA&SM Photo)

Heinkel HD 38 fighter biplane/floatplane.  (SDA&SM Photo)

Heinkel HD 43 fighter biplane (prototype).  (SDA&SM Photo)

Heinkel He 45, bomber/trainer in Spain, ca 1939.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 46, reconnaissance.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 49 fighter biplane (prototype).  (SDA&SM Photos)

Heinkel He 50, reconnaissance/dive bomber biplane.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 51B-1, fighter/close-support biplane captured by Spanish Republicans in Spain and shipped to the USSR, shown here in Soviet markings at the NII-VVS.  This aircraft had been flown by the Condor Legion for the Spanish Nationalists.  The Soviets test flew several German military aircraft brought from Spain for examination in 1937-1938.  The aircraft tested by the Soviet Air Forces Scientific Research Institute specialists included the  He 51B and Bf 109 fighters, as well as Ju 52, Ju 86, and He 111 bombers.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Heinkel He 51B, Bulgarian Air Force.  (Bulgarian Air Force Photo)

Heinkel He 51L, reconnaissance/dive bomber biplane.  (Edgar Diegan Photo)

Heinkel He 59, biplane reconnaissance seaplane.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 60, ship-borne reconnaissance biplane float-plane.   (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 70 Blitz, single-engine transport mailplane, 1932.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 72 Kadett, trainer.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 74, fighter/advanced trainer (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 100, fighter (prototype). At least one of these aircraft was provided to the Soviet Union by Germany for evaluation in 1940.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 112, fighter.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 113, (propaganda designation for He 100).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 111.  (Luftwaffe Photos)


Heinkel He 111H, (Wk. Nr. unknown), previously` 5J + CR' of III / KG4, captured in Libya in 1942.  Designated HS-? by the RAF, it was named "Delta Lily" and flown by No. 260 Squadron.  It was reported as being on a scrap dump at Fanara in the Suez Canal Zone, Egypt in April 1947. (RAF Photos)


Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), coded NT+SL.  This aircraft was built in 1944 and modified to drop Fallschirmjäger (paratroops).  It is on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (Dapi89 Photo)

Heinkel He 111 P-2 (5J+CN), (Wk. Nr. 1526) 5.Staffel/Kampfgeschwader 54 (KG 54 - Bomber Wing 54), on display at the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNAF) Museum at Gardermoen, part of the Norwegian Armed Forces Aircraft Collection.  The 5J Geschwaderkennung code on the aircraft is usually documented as being that of either I. Gruppe/KG 4 or KG 100, with B3 being KG 54's equivalent code throughout the war.   (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Heinkel He 111 E-3.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 111 E-3 (25+82), (Wk. Nr. 2940). with the "conventional" cockpit is on display at the Museo del Aire, Madrid, Spain, having served in the Condor Legion.  (Hugh Lleweln Photo)

Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433), 2B+DC, "Red 4", surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944.  This aircraft was shipped to the the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600.  It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)


CASA-2.111B, Auto & Technic museum Sinsheim.  (AlfvanBeem Photo)

(Dirk1981 Photo)

(C1d2wiki Photo)

CASA-2.111B (Serial No. Bl-2117), flown by the Spanish Air Force until 1972, was renumbered as Luftwaffe G1+AD and flown to Gatow slung under a Sikorsky CH-53 helicopter in 1995.  This aircraft was restored and is now on display in the Luftwaffenmuseum Berlin-Gatow in Germany.

Heinkel He 114, reconnaissance float-plane.   (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 115, general-purpose floatplane in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)



Heinkel He 116, +VQ, transport/reconnaissance.  (Luftwaffe Photo, left, SDASM Photo, right)

Heinkel He 119, bomber/reconnaissance (prototype).   (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 162 Volksjäger

Heinkel He 162 Volksjäger, (Wk. Nr. 200001), left and another, right, in their factory finish paint schemes.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 162 aircraft in a large underground factory at Hinterbruhl, Germany in April 1945.  United States Ninth Army troops found these nearly completed aircraft in a former salt mine near Engels.  Built 300 metres underground, a large elevator was used to bring the aircraft to the surface.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, White 3, Erproungskommando 162.  The He 162A-2 Volksjäger or “People’s Fighter” was also known as Salamander, which was the code name of its construction program, and Spatz (“Sparrow”), which was the name given to the aircraft by the Heinkel company.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120221) captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Designated RAF AM58, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.

(RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, RAF (Serial No. VH513) flyover at Farnborough, 1946.

(Author Photo)

(CA&SM Photo)

(Ra Boe Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120076), "Yellow 4", captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM59, later RAF Serial No. VH523, this aircraft was held by the Canada Air and Space Museum in Ottawa.  It was traded to Aero Vintage in the UK for a Bristol Fighter (G-AANM, D-7889) in December 2006.  Wk. Nr. 120076 is now on display at the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin, Germany.

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120074), White 11, 20, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM60, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.  (RAF Photo)


Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120086), Yellow 2, JG1, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM62, this aircraft was on display in Hyde Park, London, England post war.  This aircraft was later shipped to Canada and is on display in the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. (RAF Photo)

(Author Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2 Volksjäger, (Wk. Nr. 120086), coded "Yellow 2", JG1, designated RAF AM62, currently on display in the Canada Air and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  This aircraft surrendered at Leck, and was moved to Farnborough by surface transport on 22 August 1945.  AM 62 was allocated to No. 47 MU, Sealand, on 29 May 1946 for packing and shipping to Canada.  It also left Salford Docks on 26 August aboard SS Manchester Commerce, arriving at Montréal on 9 September 1946.  It has been in the CASM since 1964.

(AWM Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120095), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM63, this aircraft is shown here on display in the UK post war.  It was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

(RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2 (Wr. Nr. 120097) in the indoor part of RAE Farnborough’s exhibition of enemy aircraft Oct-Nov 1945.

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120227) of JG 1, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM65, later VN629 this aircraft was brought to Farnborough by surface transport on 31 July 1945.  It was not flown by the RAF.  It is currently on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (Dapi99 Photo)


Heinkel He 162A-1, (Wk. Nr. 120235), originally coded Red 6, now painted coded Yellow 6, JG1, was captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  This aircraft was not initially allocated an Air Ministry number, likely because it was intended for use as a ballistics target.  It has reportedly later designated RAF AM68.  Initially on display at RAF Cranwell it was transferred to the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth in London, but is now on display at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, England.  (Tony Hisgett Photo)


Heinkel He 162, 27, damaged at the end of the war, captured by American forces in May 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162 A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120077), "Red 1" being test flown as USA FE-489, later T2-489.  This aircraft is now with the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.  (USAAF Photos)

(Alan Wilson Photo)

(Goshimini Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120077) "Nervenklau" is currently owned by the Planes of Fame Museum and is on static display at Chino, California.  This aircraft was sent to the United States in 1945 where it was given the designation USA FE-489 (Foreign Equipment No. 489) and later T2-489.

Heinkel He 162A-1, fuselage (Wk. Nr. 120222), coded White 4, later repainted Yellow 7, USA FE-493, later T2-493, at USAAF Depot Y76 Kassel, Germany before shipment to the USA.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-1, fuselage (Wk. Nr. 120222), originally coded White 4, repainted Yellow 7, USA FE-493, later T2-493, with a wing from He 162A-1 (Wk. Nr. 120067), at Freeman Field, Seymour, Indiana Ohio post-war.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120230), coded White 23, 1/JG1, captured by the British at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in May 1945. Transferred by the RAF to the USA, coded USA FE-504, later T2-504, this aircraft is now with the NASM. (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2 Spatz (Sparrow),Volksjager (Wk. Nr. 120230), coded White 23, 1/JG1, painted (Wk. Nr. 120222), USA FE-504, later T2-504, with the tail of (Wk. Nr. 120222).  This aircraft is stored with the National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.  This aircraft was one of thirty-one JG 1 aircraft manufactured by Heinkel at Rostock-Marienehe and captured by the British at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany on 8 May 1945.  It was painted with the number White 23, and its red-white-black nose bands were in reverse order from the usual paint scheme, which may indicate that the wing commander and high-scoring ace, Col Herbert Ihlefeld, flew this particular aircraft.  After transfer to Britain, the US Army Air Forces accepted the airplane and shipped it to Wright Field, Ohio, for evaluation. It received the foreign equipment number FE-504, later T2-504, and was later moved to Freeman Field, Indiana.  For unknown reasons, mechanics replaced the tail unit at Wright Field with the tail unit of aircraft Wk. Nr. 120222.  FE-504/T2-504 was apparently never flown.  Its flying days ended permanently when someone at Freeman Field neatly sawed through the outer wing panels sometime before September 1946.  The wings were reattached with door hinges and the jet was shipped to air shows and military displays around the country.  The US Air Force transferred the aircraft to the Smithsonian Institution in 1949 but it remained in storage at Park Ridge, Illinois, until transfer to the Garber Facility in January 1955. National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia. (USAAF Photos)


Heinkel He 172, trainer (prototype).  The He 176 rocket-powered aircraft was the world's first to be propelled solely by a liquid-fuelled rocket, making its first powered flight on 20 June 1939.  (Drawing and Photo, SDA&SM)

Heinkel He 177A-5/R6 Greif (Griffon) long-range heavy bomber.  (Luftwaffe Photos)



Heinkel He 177A-7 Grief, (Wk. Nr. 550256), coded GP+RY, captured at Toulouse-Blagnac, France in Sep 1944.  It wore French markings including the title “Prise de Guerra”, until it was allocated to the USA.  It had the star and bar insignia added and was marked 56 under the nose section.  This aircraft crashed at Paris-Orly airport at the start of its intended ferry flight to the USA on 28 Feb 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 178.  This aircraft flew for the first time in August 1939, marking the first flight of a jet powered aircraft in history. The He 178 had a top speed of 380mph, but the jets rapid consumption of fuel kept its range short at 200km.  Preliminary plans were in place to weaponize the design, but it was never progressed to the production stage.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu night fighter in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)


Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310189), D5+CL of I/NJG 3 night fighter captured at Grove, Denmark.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM22.  It was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.  RCAF Squadron Leaders Joe McCarthy and Ian Somerville both flew these aircraft.  (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 219A Uhu in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 219A-0 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 210903), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 8, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, and re-designated USA FE-612 at Freeman Field, Indiana post war.  This aircraft was scrapped about 1950.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, later T2-614, Freeman Field Indiana fall 1945.  This aircraft is preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (Mark Pellegrini Photo)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (Kogo Photos)

Heinkel He 274, (Wk. Nr. unknown) high-altitude bomber.  Two prototypes were completed by the French post-war and put into service with the Armée de l'Air.  (Armée de l'Air Photos)

Heinkel He 277 Amerika Bomber, heavy bomber (project).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 280, jet fighter (prototype), DL+AS.  At the end of the war the Soviet Union collected three damaged twin-engine He 280 fighters with Heinkel S 8a engines at Vienna, Austria.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 343A-1, jet bomber (project) prototypes.  In January 1944, the RLM funded 20 aircraft including a series of 4 prototypes.  The eventual He-343 A1 bomber was operated by 1/KG76 at Burg near Magdeburg.  (Luftwaffe artwork)

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