Artillery in Canada (6) Québec: Knowlton, Brome County Historical Society Museum

Artillerie préservée au Québec, Knowlton, Musée de la société historique du comté de Brome

Artillery preserved in Québec, Knowlton, Brome County Historical Society Museum

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

Le but de ce site Web est de localiser, d'identifier et de documenter chaque pièce d'artillerie historique conservée au Canada.
De nombreux contributeurs ont aidé à la recherche de ces armes à feu pour fournir et mettre à jour les données trouvées sur
ces pages Web. Les photos sont de l'auteur, sauf indication contraire. Toute erreur trouvée ici est de l'auteur, et tout ajout, correction
ou amendement à cette liste d'armes à feu et d'artillerie au Canada serait le bienvenu et peut être envoyé par courriel à l'auteur
à hskaarup@rogers.com.
Pour toutes les données officielles concernant le Régiment royal de l'Artillerie canadienne, veuillez cliquer sur le lien vers
leur site Web: du Régiment royal de l'Artillerie canadienne.

Remarque: À l'époque, l'artillerie au Canada était désignée par son indicatif d'appel radio «Sheldrake».  Il est maintenant
désigné par son indicatif d'appel "Golf". (Acorn envoie)Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié.  Vos corrections, changements
et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com.

Knowlton, Brome County Historical Society Museum, 120 Lakeside, Quebec.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3213518)

German trench mortars of various calibres captured by Canadians, being examined by LGen Sir Julian Byng, after Vimy, May 1917.

Mortiers de tranchée allemands de divers calibres capturés par des Canadiens, examinés par le Lgén sir Julian Byng, après Vimy, mai 1917.

German First World War Granatwerfer 16 spigot mortar (Serial Nr. unknown).

Mortier allemand Granatwerfer 16 spigot de la Première Guerre mondiale (numéro de série inconnu).

(Author Photos)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), possibly (Serial Nr. 5001), captured by the 3rd Canadian Division.  On base, no wheels.

Leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art allemand de la Première Guerre mondiale de 7,58 cm (7,58 cm de gauche), possiblement
(numéro de série 5001), capturé par la 3e division canadienne. Sur la base, pas de roues.

The 7.58 cm Minenwerfer a.A. (alter Art or old model) (7.58 cm leMW).  The Germans fielded a whole series of mortars before the beginning of the First World War.  Their term for them was Minenwerfer, literally mine-thrower; they were initially assigned to engineer units in their siege warfare role.  By the Winter of 1916-17, they were transferred to infantry units where the leMW's light weight permitted them to accompany the foot-soldiers in the advance.  In common with Rheinmetall's other Minenwerfer designs, the leMW was a rifled muzzle-loader that had hydraulic cylinders on each side of the tube to absorb the recoil forces and spring recuperators to return the tube to the firing position.  It had a rectangular firing platform with limited traverse and elevation.  Wheels could be added to ease transportation or it could be carried by at least six men.  In 1916, a new version, designated as the n.A. or neuer Art, was fielded that included a circular firing platform, giving a turntable effect, which permitted a full 360 degree traverse.  It also had a longer 16 inches (410 mm) barrel and could be used for direct fire between 0° and 27° elevation if the new 90 kg (200 lb) trail was fitted to absorb the recoil forces.  In this mode it was pressed into service as an anti-tank gun.

Le Minenwerfer a.A. de 7,58 cm (modifier Art ou ancien modèle) (7,58 cm gauche). Les Allemands ont déployé toute une série
de mortiers avant le début de la Première Guerre mondiale. Leur terme pour eux était Minenwerfer, littéralement lanceur de mines;
ils ont été initialement affectés à des unités du génie dans leur rôle de guerre de siège. À l'hiver 1916-17, ils ont été transférés dans
des unités d'infanterie où le poids léger de la gauche leur a permis d'accompagner les fantassins dans l'avance. En commun avec
les autres modèles Minenwerfer de Rheinmetall, le leMW était un chargeur de bouche rayé qui avait des cylindres hydrauliques
de chaque côté du tube pour absorber les forces de recul et des récupérateurs à ressort pour ramener le tube en position de tir. Il
avait une plate-forme de tir rectangulaire avec une traversée et une élévation limitées. Des roues pourraient être ajoutées pour
faciliter le transport ou il pourrait être porté par au moins six hommes. En 1916, une nouvelle version, désignée sous le nom de
n.A. ou Neuer Art, a été mis en service qui comprenait une plate-forme de tir circulaire, donnant un effet de plaque tournante, ce
qui permettait une traversée complète à 360 degrés. Il avait également un canon plus long de 16 pouces (410 mm) et pouvait être
utilisé pour le tir direct entre 0 ° et 27 ° d'élévation si la nouvelle traînée de 90 kg (200 lb) était équipée pour absorber les forces
de recul. Dans ce mode, il a été mis en service comme canon antichar.

(Author Photo)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. unknown), no base, no wheels.  352, G3298 (with an upside down 20 above).  Marked “captured by the 25th Battalion on 18 August 1917”.

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 7,58 cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7,58 cm leMW), (numéro de série inconnu), pas
de base, pas de roues. 352, G3298 (avec un 20 à l'envers au-dessus). Marqué «capturé par le 25e bataillon le 18 août 1917».

(Author Photos)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), possibly (Serial Nr. 41214), marked H516, 2.0 MR, mounted on wheels.  Captured by 2nd Battalion (Canadian Mounted Rifles), 2nd Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 7,58 cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7,58 cm leMW), peut-être (numéro de série 41214),
marqué H516, 2.0 MR, monté sur roues. Capturé par le 2e Bataillon (Canadian Mounted Rifles), 2e Brigade d'infanterie, 3e
Division canadienne, Corps expéditionnaire canadien (CEC).

(Author Photos)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 6043), 1917 M, captured ca 1918 by the 102ndBattalion (Central Ontario), 11th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), in France.  The Official War Record lists this trench mortar as captured by the 10th Battalion, 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) in France.

Mittlerer Minenwerfer de 17 cm de la Première Guerre mondiale (17 cm mMW), (numéro de série 6043), 1917 M, capturé vers
1918 par le 102e bataillon (centre de l'Ontario), 11e brigade d'infanterie, 4e division canadienne, Corps expéditionnaire canadien
(CEC) ), En France. Le registre de guerre officiel indique que ce mortier de tranchée a été capturé par le 10e Bataillon, 1re
Brigade d'infanterie, 1re Division canadienne, Corps expéditionnaire canadien (CEC) en France.

The 17 cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17 cm mMW).  This mortar was useful in destroying bunkers and field fortifications otherwise immune to normal artillery.  It was a muzzle-loading, rifled mortar that had a standard hydro-spring recoil system. It fired 50 kilogram (110 lb) HE shells, which contained far more explosive filler than ordinary artillery shells of the same calibre.  The low muzzle velocity allowed for thinner shell walls, hence more space for filler. Furthermore, the low velocity allowed for the use of explosives like Ammonium Nitrate-Carbon that were less shock-resistant than TNT, which was in short supply.  This caused a large number of premature detonations that made crewing the minenwerfer riskier than normal artillery pieces.  A new version of the weapon, with a longer barrel, was put into production at some point during the war.  It was called the 17 cm mMW n/A (neuer Art) or new pattern, while the older model was termed the a/A (alter Art) or old pattern.  In action the mMW was emplaced in a pit, after its wheels were removed, not less than 1.5 meters deep to protect it and its crew.  It could be towed short distances by four men or carried by 17.  Despite its extremely short range, the mMW proved to be very effective at destroying bunkers and other field fortifications.  Consequently its numbers went from 116 in service when the war broke out to some 2,361 in 1918.

Le mittlerer Minenwerfer de 17 cm (17 cm mMW). Ce mortier était utile pour détruire des bunkers et des fortifications de
campagne autrement immunisés contre l'artillerie normale. Il s'agissait d'un mortier rayé à chargement par la bouche doté d'un
système de recul à ressort hydraulique standard. Il a tiré des obus HE de 50 kilogrammes (110 lb), qui contenaient beaucoup
plus de charge explosive que les obus d'artillerie ordinaires du même calibre. La faible vitesse initiale a permis des parois de
coquille plus minces, donc plus d'espace pour le remplissage. En outre, la faible vitesse a permis l'utilisation d'explosifs comme
le nitrate d'ammonium-carbone qui étaient moins résistants aux chocs que le TNT, qui était en pénurie. Cela a provoqué un grand
nombre de détonations prématurées qui ont rendu l'équipage du minenwerfer plus risqué que les pièces d'artillerie normales.
Une nouvelle version de l'arme, avec un canon plus long, a été mise en production à un moment donné pendant la guerre. Il
s'appelait le 17 cm mMW n / A (Neuer Art) ou nouveau modèle, tandis que l'ancien modèle était appelé a / A (alter Art) ou
ancien modèle. En action, le mMW a été placé dans une fosse, après que ses roues aient été enlevées, à pas moins de 1,5 mètre
de profondeur pour le protéger ainsi que son équipage. Il pouvait être remorqué sur de courtes distances par quatre hommes ou
porté par 17. Malgré sa portée extrêmement courte, le mMW s'est avéré très efficace pour détruire les bunkers et autres
fortifications de campagne. Par conséquent, ses effectifs sont passés de 116 en service lorsque la guerre a éclaté à quelque 2361
en 1918.

(Author Photo)

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), damaged, no markings visible, possibly (Serial Nr. 1524), captured on 9 April 1917 by the 102ndBattalion (Central Ontario), 11th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), at Vimy Ridge.

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25 cm sMW), endommagé, pas de marques visibles,
peut-être (numéro de série 1524), capturé le 9 avril 1917 par le 102e bataillon (centre de l'Ontario), 11e brigade d'infanterie,
4e Division canadienne, Corps expéditionnaire canadien (CEC), à la crête de Vimy.

The 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer (German for "mine launcher"), often abbreviated as 25 cm sMW, was a heavy trench mortar developed for the Imperial German Army in the first decade of the 20th century.  It was developed for use by engineer troops for destroying bunkers and fortifications otherwise immune to normal artillery.  The 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer was a muzzle-loading, rifled mortar that had a hydro-spring type recoil system.  It fired either a 97 kg (210 lb) shell or a 50 kg (110 lb) shell, both contained far more explosive filler than ordinary artillery shells of the same caliber.  The low muzzle velocity allowed for thinner shell walls, hence more space for filler for the same weight shell.  The low velocity also allowed the use of explosives like ammonium nitrate–carbon that were less shock-resistant than TNT, which was in short supply at the time.  Shells filled with TNT caused a large number of premature detonations, making the Minenwerfer riskier for the gun crew than normal artillery pieces.  In service, the wheels were removed and the sMW was then placed in a pit or trench at least 1.5 meters (4 ft 11 in) deep, protecting the mortar and its crew.  Despite the extremely short range, the sMW proved to be very effective as its massive shells were almost as effective in penetrating fortifications as the largest siege guns in the German inventory, including the 42 centimeters (17 in) Dicke Bertha (Big Bertha), a howitzer that was more than 50 times the weight of the sMW.  The effectiveness of the sMW is indicated by the number in service, which increased from 44 when the war broke out, to 1,234 at its end.  In 1916, a new longer barrelled version was put into production.  This new model, which had a longer range, was designated the 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer neuer Art (German for "new pattern"), which was abbreviated as 25 cm sMW n/A.  The older, short-barrel model was then designated as the 25 cm sMW a/A (alter Art)(German for "old pattern").

Le schwerer Minenwerfer de 25 cm (en allemand pour «lance-mines»), souvent abrégé en 25 cm sMW, était un mortier de
tranchée lourd développé pour l'armée impériale allemande dans la première décennie du 20e siècle. Il a été développé pour
être utilisé par les troupes du génie pour détruire des bunkers et des fortifications autrement immunisés contre l'artillerie normale.
Le schwerer Minenwerfer de 25 cm était un mortier rayé à chargement par la bouche doté d'un système de recul de type
hydro-ressort. Il a tiré soit un obus de 97 kg (210 lb) ou un obus de 50 kg (110 lb), tous deux contenant beaucoup plus de
charge explosive que les obus d'artillerie ordinaires du même calibre. La faible vitesse initiale permettait d'obtenir des parois
de coquille plus minces, d'où plus d'espace pour le remplissage pour la même coquille de poids. La faible vitesse a également
permis l'utilisation d'explosifs comme le nitrate d'ammonium-carbone qui étaient moins résistants aux chocs que le TNT, qui
était en pénurie à l'époque. Les obus remplis de TNT ont provoqué un grand nombre de détonations prématurées, rendant le
Minenwerfer plus risqué pour l'équipage du canon que les pièces d'artillerie normales. En service, les roues ont été enlevées et
le sMW a ensuite été placé dans une fosse ou une tranchée d'au moins 1,5 mètre (4 pi 11 po) de profondeur, protégeant le mortier
et son équipage. Malgré la portée extrêmement courte, le sMW s'est avéré très efficace car ses obus massifs étaient presque aussi
efficaces pour pénétrer les fortifications que les plus gros canons de siège de l'inventaire allemand, y compris les 42 centimètres
(17 po) Dicke Bertha (Big Bertha), un obusier qui était plus de 50 fois le poids du sMW. L'efficacité du sMW est indiquée par
le nombre en service, qui est passé de 44 lorsque la guerre a éclaté à 1 234 à la fin. En 1916, une nouvelle version à canon plus
long a été mise en production. Ce nouveau modèle, qui avait une portée plus longue, a été désigné le 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer
neuer Art (en allemand pour «nouveau modèle»), qui a été abrégé en 25 cm sMW n / A. L'ancien modèle à canon court a alors
été désigné sous le nom de 25 cm sMW a / A (alter Art) (en allemand pour «ancien modèle»).

(Normand Roberge Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 8382), captured on 9 Oct 1918 by the 5th Battalion (Canadian Mounted Rifles), 8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditonary Force (CEF), Cambrai, France.

Première guerre mondiale allemande 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 nA), (Serial Nr.8382), capturé le 9 octobre
1918 par le 5th Battalion (Canadian Mounted Rifles), 8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Force Expéditonaire
Canadienne (CEF), Cambrai, France.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of the First World War. However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.

Le Feldkanone 96 neuer Art de 7,7 cm (7,7 cm FK 96 n.A.) est un canon de campagne allemand. Le canon combinait le canon de l'ancien FK 96 de 7,7 cm avec un système de recul, une nouvelle culasse et un nouveau chariot. Les FK 96 existants ont été améliorés au fil du temps. Le FK 96 n.A. était plus courte, mais plus légère que le canon français de 75 modèle 1897 ou le canon britannique Ordnance QF 18 livres; les Allemands accordent une importance particulière à la mobilité, ce qui les a bien servis au début de la Première Guerre mondiale. Cependant, une fois le front devenu statique, la cadence de tir plus élevée du canon français et les obus plus lourds tirés par le canon britannique ont désavantagé les Allemands. Les Allemands ont remédié à ce problème en développant le FK 16 de 7,7 cm à plus longue portée mais plus lourd. Comme la plupart des canons de son époque, le FK 96 n.A. avait des sièges pour deux membres d'équipage montés sur son bouclier anti-éclats.

(Author Photos)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, mounted on a Schlitten stand, (Serial Nr. 7290).

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 7,92 mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, monté sur un support Schlitten,
(numéro de série 7290).

(Author Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Erfurt MG 08/15 Machinegun, (Serial Nr. 7446).

Première Guerre mondiale allemande 7,92 mm Maxim Erfurt MG 08/15, mitrailleuse (numéro de série 7446).

(Author Photos)

German First World War 7.92-mm Schwarzlose Osterreichische Waffen M07.12 MG, Machine Gun, (Serial Nr. 38761), unmounted.  Likely captured ca 1918 by a Battalion of an Infantry Brigade, with a Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), in France.

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 7,92 mm Schwarzlose Osterreichische Waffen M07.12 MG, mitrailleuse, (numéro
de série 38761), non monté. Probablement capturé vers 1918 par un bataillon d'une brigade d'infanterie, avec une division
canadienne, Corps expéditionnaire canadien (CEC), en France.

(Author Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau Maxim Luft Maschinen Gewehr 08/18 (LMG 08/18) air-cooled pair of machine-guns (Serial Nr. 883B),  and (Serial Nr. 921B), mounted on an original Fokker D.VII.

Allemand Première Guerre mondiale 7,92 mm Spandau Maxim Luft Maschinen Gewehr 08/18 (LMG 08/18) paire de
mitrailleuses refroidies par air (Serial Nr. 883B), et (Serial Nr. 921B), monté sur un Fokker D.VII.

(Author Photos)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, Carriage No. 5998, (should be associated with recoil mechanism No. 1016 and barrel No. 26040).  The RCA held 138 of these guns.  In June 1947 the Canadian Army had 149 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Guns in the inventory.  Infantry anti-tank platoons also used them (apparently under protest). 25 CIBG quickly replaced theirs in Korea, but did not turn them in.  Canada did not manufacture them during the war, but CAL and 202WD carried out a major overhaul on them in the late 1940s.  On 12 Sep 1952, the anti-tank defence role was turned over to the RCAC and the 17-pounders were withdrawn and offered to NATO.   Many later became memorials or gate guards, beginning in 1959. (Doug Knight)

Canon antichar remorqué QF de 17 livres, chariot n ° 5998 (doit être associé au mécanisme de recul n ° 1016 et au canon
n ° 26040).  L'ARC détenait 138 de ces armes. En juin 1947, l'Armée canadienne avait 149 canons antichar remorqués
QF de 17 livres dans son inventaire. Des pelotons antichars d'infanterie les ont également utilisés (apparemment sous
protestation). Le CIBG a rapidement remplacé les leurs en Corée, mais ne les a pas rendus. Le Canada ne les a pas
fabriqués pendant la guerre, mais CAL et 202WD ont procédé à une révision majeure à la fin des années 1940. Le 12
septembre 1952, le rôle de défense antichar est transféré au RCAC et les 17 livres sont retirés et offerts à l'OTAN. Beaucoup
sont devenus plus tard des monuments commémoratifs ou des gardes de porte, à partir de 1959. (Doug Knight)

Other articles in category

Artillery