Canadian Warplanes 5: Canadair CP-107 Argus

Canadair CP-107 Argus

(CAF Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20720).

The Canadair CP-107 Argus (CL-28) was a maritime reconnaissance aircraft designed and manufactured by Canadair for the RCAF.  In its early years, the Argus was reputedly the finest anti-submarine patrol bomber in the world.  The Argus served throughout the Cold War with the RCAF's Maritime Air Command and later the CF's Maritime Air Group and Air Command.

Canadair began work on the CL-28 in April 1954 and at the time it was the largest aircraft built in Canada. The hybrid design, initially referred to as the 'Britannia Maritime Reconnaissance', or 'Britannia MR', was derived from the Bristol Britannia transport, having the same wings, tail surfaces and landing gear, but using standard North American parts instead of British parts.  The fuselage was redesigned to incorporate an unpressurised one with bomb bays fore and aft of the wings.  The Argus was powered by four  Wright R-3350 compound (piston) engines, which had a low fuel consumption necessary for extended missions at low level.

The Argus replaced the Avro Lancaster in RCAF service as well as the Lockheed CF-122 Neptune which had been flown in the maritime roles.  The Argus was considered to be one of the most effective anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft of its day, and served as a mainstay for the RCAF.  A large amount of equipment was carried, including: search radar, sonobuoys, electronic counter measures (ECM), explosive echo ranging (EER) and a magnetic anomaly detector (MAD).  Up to 8,000 lb (3,632 kg) of weapons could be carried in the bomb bays, including torpedoes, bombs, mines and Mk. 54 depth charges.  The Argus was replaced by the Lockheed CP-140 Aurora aircraft.

(Greg Goebel Photo)

Mk. 54, Mod 1 depth charge, nominal weight 350lb, on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.  This depth charge was designed to be dropped from aircraft like the Argus.  The bomb had a flat nose to reduce the risk from ricochets.  The tail fuze had five different depth settings ranging from 8 to 42 metres (25 to 125 feet).

The Argus was flown with a crew of 15 consisting of three pilots, three navigators (Observer Long range), two flight engineers and six radio officers (observer rad) until the early 1960s when the crew included both commissioned officers (tactical navigator/radio navigator) and non commissioned officers (observers), the number of which was dependent on the mission.  Four crew bunks and a galley were provided to extend the efficiency of the crew on long patrols (average 18 hrs).  The CL-28 had an endurance of approximately 26½ hours with full armament.  An Argus flown by No. 407 Maritime Patrol Squadron held the Canadian military record of slightly over 31 hours for the longest flight by an unrefuelled aircraft.

The principal difference between the Argus Mk. I and Mk. II was primarily in the different navigation, communication and tactical electronic equipment fitted internally.  The Mk. I was fitted with an American APS-20 radar in a chin-mounted radome. (13 built).  Externally, the Mk II was fitted with a British ASV-21 radar in a chin-mounted radome. (20-built).  The Mk. II nose radome was smaller, and this version was equipped with an additional ECM antenna above the fuselage.  

The Argus was flown by Nos. 404, 405, 407, 415 and 449 Sqns.  The Argus flew its last service mission on 24 July 1981, and was replaced by the Lockheed CP-140 Aurora.  (Wikipedia)

Canadair CL-28-1, CP-107 Argus Mk. 1 (13), (Serial Nos. 20710, 20711, 20712, 20713, 20714, 20715, 20716, 20717, 20718, 20719, 20720, 20721, 20722), Mk. 2 (20), (Serial Nos. 20723, 20724, 20725, 20726, 20727, 20728, 20729, 20730, 20731, 20732, 20733, 20734, 20735, 20736, 20737, 20738, 30739, 20740, 20741, 20742), for a total of 33 aircraft.

Detailed records of all known RCAF and Allied aircraft flown by Canadians may be viewed on line in the Canadian Aircraft Serials Personnel Information Resource (CASPIR). The CASPIR website is researched, coded, maintained entirely by Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum(CWHM) volunteers with only one staff assisting periodically. This work has taken several years, and is unlikely to be finished as continuing research leads to “new finds” and rediscovered Canadian aviation heritage and history.  The CWHM volunteer team looks forward to continuing to update and correct the record as additional information and photos are received. For the Argus, check here.

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20710), lead aircraft in an Argus line-up at CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

The Canadair CP-107 Argus (company designation CL-28) was a maritime patrol aircraft designed and manufactured by Canadair for the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). In its early years, the Argus was reputedly the finest anti-submarine patrol bomber in the world. The Argus served throughout the Cold War in the RCAF's Maritime Air Command and later the Canadian Force's Maritime Air Group and Air Command.

In 1949, Canadair recognized that the RCAF would soon be looking for a replacement for the Avro Lancasters being used in the maritime patrol role and proposed the CL-29, a variant of the North Star, itself a variant of the Douglas C-54 Skymaster or DC-4 transport. When the RCAF issued the specification in 1952, it was for a larger and more capable aircraft, and two proposals were received. These included a Lockheed Constellation variant from Lockheed, however its low speed handling was deemed inadequate by the RCAF, while Bristol proposed a variant of their Britannia airliner but concerns were raised over its floating controls, where they were controlled via servo tabs rather than direct linkages. The RCAF preferred the Bristol proposal, but it would be developed in Canada. Canadair presented two proposals, the CL-28 also based on the Britannia, which was accepted, and a lowest cost design called the CL-33 which was described as a fat Lancaster. It would have comparable to the Avro Shackleton already being operated by the RAF, but significantly lighter, and was to be powered by the same engines as were used in the CL-28, or similar radial engines.

Canadair began work on the CL-28 in April 1954 and at the time it was the largest aircraft to be built in Canada. The hybrid design, initially referred to as the 'Britannia Maritime Reconnaissance', or 'Britannia MR', was derived from the Bristol Britannia airliner, having the same wings, tail surfaces and landing gear except for being "Americanized" meaning that it used the same general design, but changed from British materials, dimensions and standard parts to American ones. Due to the greater stresses from flying at low altitude for long periods of time, even the components taken from the Britannia needed substantial reinforcement, and to meet these demands, extensive use of a locally developed metal to metal bonding was used. The Argus represented the first large scale use of titanium in the structure, as well as structural plastic, which was used to electrically insulate the top of the fin for the sensors mounted there.

The fuselage was completely redesigned by Canadair, going from the pressure cabin used in the Britannia to an unpressurised one with two 18 ft (5.5 m) long bomb bays fore and aft of the wings. The powerplants were also changed from the Bristol Proteus turboprop engines to Wright R-3350 turbo-compound piston radial engines, which had lower fuel consumption necessary for extended missions at low level. At the design stage the Napier Nomad, another turbo compound engine was also considered, although the Nomad was later cancelled. (Wikipedia)

No. 405 "Eagle" (MP) Squadron logo.

(DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20710), No. 405 "Eagle" (MP) Squadron, pre-delivery photo taken at Canadair in Cartierville, Quebec. First flight on 28 March 1957, in overall natural metal finish, wearing 405 Squadron code "VN*710". Used by Canadair for initial trials. To No. 404 (MP) Squadron, at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS from June 1960. To Central Experimental & Proving Establishment April to September 1961, then back to 404 Squadron. Repainted by Canadair at Montreal in September 1966, and again in May 1967. To Fairey Aviation at Dartmouth for inspection and repair, January to March 1968, then back to 404 Squadron. To No. 449 (MT) Squadron at Greenwood on 16 July 1968. Serial Change Renumbered, became Canadian Forces 10710, 4 May 1970. Struck off strength, 17 June 1981.

(DND Archives Photo, PCN-99)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF, nose view.

(DND Archives Photo,)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF, nose view.

(RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20710), coded VN.

(DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20718), No. 415 (MP) Squadron, RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia, visiting RCAF Station Goose Bay, Labrador, c1962. First assigned to Argus Conversion Unit (a detachment of No. 2 (M) Operational Training Unit) at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 18 April 1958. Nose cone damaged by bird strike on 17 December 1966. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. Reported scrapped at Summerside, PEI in 1982.

No. 404 'Buffalo' (MP) Squadron.

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1 (Serial No. 20711), No. 404 'Buffalo' (MP) Squadron. First assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 17 February 1959. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC after Integration but before renumbering. Serving with No. 407 (MP) Squadron, CFB Comox, when it set unofficial Canadian endurance record of 32 hours airborne on May 30 to June 1, 1974, on routine patrol and search for missing boat. Scrapped in 1982.

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 10711).

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 10711).

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 10711), No. 404 Squadron.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 10711), returning to Summerside, PEI after a patrol over the Atlantic.

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20714), ca. 1958. The official debut of the Argus took place at RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia, on 17 May 1958. Transferred to Central Experimental & Proving Establishment at RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta on 25 April 1958. Trials with Bullpup missiles while there. Used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped in 1982.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20714), ca. 1958.

(RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20715), ca. 1958. First assigned to No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 27 April 1959. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Sold to Steel Services of Swift Current, Saskatchewan on 27 January 1978, for scrapping. Ownership transferred to Western Canada Aviation Museum, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Reported stored at Gimli, Manitoba in 1995. Never displayed at WCAM, later sold by them, lies derelict in a field near Gimli, Manitoba.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20716), with a USAF Lockheed F-104 Starfighter (Serial No. FG-822), prior to 1965. Possibly No. 404 Squadron. First assigned to Argus Conversion Unit (a detachment of No. 2 (M) Operational Training Unit) at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 18 April 1958. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC, dates unknown. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron in 1979. Scrapped 1982.

No. 415 "Swordfish" (MP) Squadron.

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20719), No. 415 "Swordfish" (MP) Squadron, CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island, on a NORPAT (Northern Patrol) off the coast of Greenland, 1970. First assigned to Argus Conversion Unit (a detachment of No. 2 (M) Operational Training Unit) at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 18 April 1958. Visited USNAS Norfolk, Virginal on 19 September 1958, demonstrated to senior US Navy officers. Seen at Lyneham, UK on 8 April 1962, in 405 Squadron markings. Used for special weapons trials (nuclear depth charges?) at New Mexico, USA in spring of 1963. Had been loaned to the Air Armament Evaluation Detachment at RCAF Station Cold Lake. Modified by Fairey Aviation for these trials. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. Operated by 415 (Maritime Patrol) Squadron, CFB Summerside, PEI. Scrapped 1982.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20719). Groundcrew starting up #2 engine of CP-107 Argus aircraft of No.405 Squadron, RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia. Left to Right: AE Tech - LAC R.J. Windsor, and LAC G.W. Brantnall.

(RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20719), No. 415 "Swordfish" (MP) Squadron, CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island, on a NORPAT (Northern Patrol).

No. 407 Squadron.

(DND Photo via Francois Dutil)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20720). First assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 19 September 1958. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Summerside, PEI in the 1960s. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. Scrapped 1982.

(RuthAS Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20721), No. 407 Squadron, visiting Australia in 1971.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20721). First assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC after Integration but before renumbering. Operated by No. 407 (Maritime Patrol) Squadron, CFB Comox. BC in 1979.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20721), No. 407 (Maritime Patrol) Squadron, over CFB Comox, British Columbia.

(SDASM Archives)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20722), No. 407 Squadron, visiting NAS Lemoore, California, 12 Oct 1975. First assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 407 (MP) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. Scrapped 1982.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20723), over an RCN submarine, 1970. First assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron when it toured Europe c.1960. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped 1982.

(DND Archives Photo, PCN-733)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20723), over an RCN submarine, 1962.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20723).

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20723).

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20725), Argus dropping Depth Charges over the Atlantic Ocean.  DND Canada Photo PCN-736.  The digital image is held by the National Defence Imagery Library (NDIL) at the CF Joint Imagery Centre (CFJIC), and the hard copy original film negative is held by Library and Archives Canada (LAC) in Ottawa. First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. To Canadair for repairs and equipment installation, 9 March 1960. Back to 405 Squadron on 31 October 1960. To Fairey Aviation at Halifax for inspection, 6 June 1962. To Maritime Proving & Evaluation Unit at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 1 April 1963. To 405 Squadron at Greenwood on 11 March 1963. To Fairey Aviation at Dartmouth for inspection and repair on 25 January 1967. Back to 405 Squadron on 18 April 1967. To Canadair for repainting, then back to 405 Squadron on 1 May 1967. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood from 16 July 1968. to Fairey Aviation at Dartmouth for repair, overhaul and modifications, 11 February to 21 November 1969, then back to 404 Squadron. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped 1982.

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2,  RCAF (Serial No. 20726). Assigned to No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS on 10 November 1959. With No. 449 (MT) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. With No. 407 Squadron at CFB Comox, BC when it visited UK in August 1979. With No. 449 (MT) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS, dates unknown. Scrapped 1982.

(RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2,  RCAF (Serial No. 10726), CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island.

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20727). With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood from 29 January 1959. To No. 2 (M) Operational Training Unit detachment at Greenwood on 3 February 1959. To Fairey Aviation for updates on 24 November 1960. Back at Greenwood from 30 May 1961. To Fairey again for further updates, 8 July 1964 to 6 January 1965. With Argus Conversion Unit at Greenwood in early 1965. With No. 404 Squadron, on detachment to Puerto Rico. Crashed during a night training mission 96 km (60 miles) north of Puerto Rico on 23 March 1965. All 15 crew members from the 404 squadron and one government research scientist died in the accident. When the aircraft did a low fly over near the HMS Alcide submarine, it did a hard bank and the wing caught a large swell. It impacted the water half a mile from the submarine.

(DND Archives Photo, PCN74-847)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20728), (Serial No. 10728), CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island. First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood. Served with No. 407 (MR) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood. Served with No. 407 (MR) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 10729). First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood. Served with No. 407 (MR) Squadron at CFB Comox, BC. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. Operated by Maritime Proving and Experimental Unit from CFB Summerside, PEI, on MAD equipment development tests, in mid 1970s. Flew over North Pole on 14 November 1979. To Crown Assets Disposal Coporation on 4 July 1980. Scrapped by Bristol Metal Industries in 1982.

(CAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20734), ex (Serial No. 10734), CFB Greenwood, ca 1974. First used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 449 (MT) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped 1982.

(Steve Fitzgerald Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20735), ex (Serial No. 10735), No. 415 "Swordfish" (MP) Squadron, 23 June 1979. Used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped 1982.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20735), with Cpl Murphy, RCAF Airframe Technician of No. 405 Squadron detachment NAS Roos Roads prior to departure for ASW operation Maple Spring, 1967.

(Mike Freer - Touchdown-Aviation Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20736), (Serial No. 10736). First used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Summerside, PEI in the 1960s. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron, CFB Summerside, PEI, in 1970, when it flew in the Canadian National Airshow at Toronto that summer. Still with this Squadron in 1971. Flew last operational Argus sortie, on 24 July 1981, while with No. 415 Squadron. Scrapped 1982.

(DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 10736), being loaded with torpedoes, Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

(Royal Netherlands Navy Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20736), May 1971.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20737). Used by Argus Conversion Unit at Greenwood when first delivered. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Summerside, PEI in the 1960s. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. Was RCAF 20737. Serving with No. 415 (MP) Squadron, CFB Summerside, PEI, at time of crash. Crashed at Summerside while attempting 3 engine go-around. Crash date reported as 31 March 1977 and 1 April 1977. Struck Nordair Electra parked on the airport. 3 fatalities.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20739). First used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 415 (MP) Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI after Integration but before renumbering. Operated by No. 415 (Maritime Patrol) Squadron, CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island. Became instructional airframe 749C. Preserved, and now displayed at YSU, CFB Summerside.

Maritime Proving and Evaluation Unit (MP&EU).

The MP&EU was established on 1 June 1959 and equipped with one Argus and two Neptunes  It left Greenwood for Summerside on 1 Aug 1959 and remained there until 1978, when it returned to Greenwood.  It was the successor to the RCAF's Maritime Command Evaluation and Development (E & D) unit, with No. 404 Squadron at Greenwood.

(DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus, VP404 Squadron showing crew members manning the various sensor stations in the tactical compartment of an Argus.  Note how the component on the left side, in front of the seated crew member, is covered with a black cloth. At the time of this photo this piece of gear known as Jezebel, was classified.

The Low Frequency Analyzer and Recorder (LOFAR) system, referred to as Jezebel (to cloak its true function), was a passive acoustic recorder used to analyze the sound signature of submerged submarines in order to detect them.  Like the Second World War very long range (VLR) Liberator and Lancaster bombers, the Argus dropped patterns of multiple sonobuoys in a submarine search area and passively listened for the low frequency sounds produced by a submarine's propeller, diesel engines or turbines.  The detected sounds were transmitted from the sonobuoy to the Argus via one of 31 VHF radio channels assigned to each sonobuoy.  Jezebel computed the relative strengths of the submarine sounds detected by the sonobuoys, and then displayed the frequencies of thesounds that uniquely identified or "fingerprinted" each class of submarine.  Once the target had been identified, it could be attacked with up to four homing torpedoes.

(Greenwood Aviation Museum Photo)

Soviet Golf II class diesel electric powered ballistic missile submarine, 1 Oct 1985.  The Golf II was equipped with the R-13 (SS-N-4 Sark) submarine launched ballistic missile, armed with a single nuclear warhead 1.2 to 2.0 Mt, with a range of approximately 600 km (370 mi).  The missile had a circular area probable (CAP) accuracy rate of 1.8 to 4 km (1.1 to 2.5 miles).  The missiles had to be launched with the submarine was surfaced.

(DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20740), Greenwood, Nova Scotia. Used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron in 1971. With No. 449 (MT) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. Scrapped 1982.

(DND Photo via Gord Jenkins)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20741), on the airfield at Gibraltar, 1981. First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 405 (MP) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. On display at air show at St. Mawgan, UK on 6 August 1975. Scrapped 1982.

(DND Photo via Lee Walsh)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20741), 10741, on the airfield at Gibraltar, 1981.

(DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20742), delivery, Greenwood, NS. First used by No. 405 (MP) Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, NS. Used by No. 404 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood. Appeared briefly in the 1963 movie "Call Me Bwana", starring Bob Hope and Anita Ekberg. The aircraft was visiting RAF Station Northolt when part of the movie was being filmed there, and the Argus filled in as a Russian airliner. With No. 404 (MP) Squadron at Greenwood after Integration but before renumbering. With No. 449 (MT) Squadron at CFB Greenwood, NS. With No. 405 Squadron in 1972. Later with No. 415 Squadron at CFB Summerside, PEI. Flew last ever Argus flight in February 1982, when it was ferried to the National Air Museum at YRO. Rockcliffe. Pilot was W. Griffith. Displayed outside, badly weathering, until moved into the new museum building in November 2005.

(DND Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus fleet being scrapped at CFB Summerside, 1981.  (DND Photo)

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

(DND Photos via Francois Dutil)

Canadair CP-107 Argus and Lockheed CP-140 Aurora.

Canadair CP-107 Argus maritime reconnaissance aircraft preserved:

Canada had 33 CP-107 Argus aircraft.  Of these two crashed (Serial No. 10727), and (Serial No. 10737), five are on display (Serial Nos. 10712, 10717, 10732, 10739, and 10742), one was struck off strength in Saskatoon (Serial No. 10733), one was tested to destruction at IMP in 1975 (Serial No. 10730), one went to the Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada but was scrapped (Serial No. 715 [parts still exist]). The remaining aircraft were scrapped at CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island during the winter of  1981-1982.

(stemcat5 Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20712), (Serial No. 10712), c/n 3, No. 407 Squadron, Comox Air Force Museum, CFB Comox, British Columbia.  10712 wears the No. 407 Squadron “Demon” insignia (a winged trident) on its tail fin.  No.  407 (Long Range Patrol) Squadron in Comox flew the Argus from 1968 until 1981 when it was retired from flying. Of note, the Canadian military record for the longest unrefueled flight was set by a 407 Squadron crew, who flew an Argus for over 31 hours.

(Author Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 1, RCAF (Serial No. 20717, (Serial No. 10717), Greenwood Military Aviation Museum, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

(Author Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20432), (Serial No. 10732), National Air Force Museum of Canada, CFB Trenton, Ontario.

(Author Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20432), (Serial No. 10432), 783C.  National Museum of the RCAF, CFB Trenton, Ontario.  The museum’s Argus was one of twenty purchased by the RCAF in 1958.  It flew with No. 415 Maritime Patrol ‘Swordfish’ Squadron at CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island, until 1981, (thus the swordfish markings on the tail of the aircraft).  The Argus was replaced by the Lockheed CP-140 Aurora patrol aircraft when No. 415 Squadron was moved to CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.  This Argus was stored at Mountainview, Ontario, and painted at CFB Trenton before it was brought to the museum.  (NAFMC)

(Author Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20739), (Serial No. 10739).  No. 415 Squadron.  Summerside, Heritage Aircraft Society (HAS), Summerside Airport, 173 Victoria Road.  Formerly Slemon Park, CFB Summerside, Prince Edward Island.

No. 449 (MT) Squadron.

(aeroprints.com Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus Mk. 2, RCAF (Serial No. 20742), (Serial No. 10742), No. 415 Squadron, Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  Argus (Serial No. 10742) also flew with No. 449 (MT) Squadron based at CFB Greenwood.  This aircraft was flown on the last flight of an Argus, to the CA&SM, Feb 1982.

(Mike Kaehler Photo)

Canadair CP-107 Argus (Serial No.), parts, Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Canadair CL-28-1, CP-107 Argus data bank:

           The Argus is a four-engine, long-range maritime reconnaissance aircraft, developed and built by Canadair based on the Bristol “Britannia“ commercial transport.  It flew with a 15-man crew, had a range of more than 4,000 miles and a rate of endurance of 24 hours under operational conditions.  The Mk. 1 variant had an American AN/APS-20 radar in a large fairing under the nose.  The RCAF took the first Argus on strength in 1957.  Flown by Nos. 404, 405, 407 and 415 Squadrons.  The Mk. 2 had a British AN/ASV-21 radar set in a smaller chin dome.  Both the Mk. 1 and 2 were powered by four Wright R-3350-EA1 engines.[1]

           The Argus replaced the RCAF Lancaster and Neptune aircraft types previously flown in the maritime roles.  One of the most effective anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft of its day, the Argus was a mainstay for the RCAF.  A large amount of equipment was carried, including: search radar, sonar buoys, electronic counter measures ECM), explosive echo ranging (EER) and magnetic anomaly detector (MAD).  Up to 8,000 lb (3,632 kg) of weapons could be carried in the bomb bays, including torpedoes, bombs, mines and depth charges.

           A flight crew of five consisting of two pilots, a navigator, a flight engineer and a radio operator plus relief crew of four was normally carried.  In addition, there were six or more ASW equipment operators, the number of which was dependent on the mission.  Two crew bunks and a galley were provided to extend the efficiency of the crew on long patrols.  The CL-28 had an endurance of approximately 26½ hours.  An Argus flown by 407 Maritime Patrol Squadron held the record of slightly over 31 hours for the longest flight by an unrefueled aircraft.  This record stood for almost 20 years until broken by the Rutan Voyageur experimental aircraft which circled the globe unrefueled.

           Argus Mk. I (13), (Serial Nos. 20710-20722), and Argus Mk. 2 (20), (Serial Nos. 20723-20742), comprised a total of 33 aircraft.  The principal difference between the Mk. I and Mk. II was primarily in the different navigation, communication and tactical electronic equipment fitted internally.  Externally, the Mk. II exhibited a redesigned smaller nose radome and additional ECM antennae above the fuselage.  The Argus flew its last service mission on 24 July 1981 and was replaced by the CP-140 Aurora.[2]

Canadair CP-107 Argus survivors:

GMAM, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia, Mk. 1 (Serial No. 10717).[3]

Summerside, Prince Edward Island, Mk. 2 (Serial No. 10739).[4]

CA&SM, Ottawa, Ontario, Mk. 2 (Serial No. 10742).[5]

NAFMC, Trenton, Ontario, Mk. 2 (Serial No. 10732).[6]

WCAM, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Mk. 1 (Serial No. 10715), cockpit section.[7]

CAFM, CFB Comox, British Columbia, Mk. 1 (Serial No. 10718).[8]

[1] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadair_CL-28.

[2] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadair_CL-28.

[3] Argus (Serial No. 10717) flew with 405 (MP) Squadron based at CFB Greenwood.

[4] Argus (Serial No. 10739) flew with 415 (MP) Squadron based at CFB Summerside.

[5] Argus (Serial No. 10742) flew with 449 (MT) Squadron based at CFB Greenwood.  This aircraft was flown on the last flight of an Argus, to the CA&SM Feb 1982.

[6] Argus (Serial No. 10732) flew with 415 (MP) Squadron based at CFB Summerside.

[7] Argus (Serial No. 10715) flew with 405 (MP) Squadron based at CFB Greenwood, parts stored at Gimli.

[8] Argus (Serial No. 10718) flew with 407 (MP) Squadron based at CFB Comox.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2266817)

Canadair CP-107 Argus stamp.

If you found this valuable, consider supporting the author.
Other articles in category

Aviation